Today's Play

May 28, 2020

SPARK Discovery – Literacy: All About Alliteration 

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn all about alliteration and how it’s used in literature! 

 

This activity will help your student to: 

1. Learn About Alliteration 

2. Practice Word Recognition 

3. Develop Language Skills 

 

Definitions

Alliteration – when words that start with the same sound are used repeatedly in phrase or sentence. 

 

SPARK Creativity – Literacy: Tongue Twisters 

A tongue twister is a phrase or sentence that uses alliteration (repeating sounds). They are often tricky to say and the faster you go, the harder they get! A few popular examples of tongue twisters are: 

 

“Fat frogs flying past fast.” 

“She sells seashells down by the seashore.” 

“Rubber baby buggy bumpers.” 

“A big black bug bit a big black bear and the big black bear bled black blood” 

 

You can see how alliteration helps tongue twisters take shape. Notice how the words with similar sounds aren’t always right next to each other, just close in the sentence. Also observe how it’s not always the same letter, but the same sound, that creates an alliterative phrase. Do you think you can put your knowledge of alliteration to the test to create your own tongue twister? Give it a try and make sure to share them with us! 

 

Materials needed for this activity: paper and pencil or pen 

 

Make sure to share your tongue twisters with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay 

 

This activity will help your student to: 

1. Develop Writing Skills 

2. Practice Literary Understanding 

3. Identify Sounds in Words 

 

SPARK Inspiration – Literacy: Alliteration Scavenger Hunt 

Let’s go on an alliteration adventure! Travel around your happy home and see what kind of items you can find that go great together to create awesome alliteration. For example, start with the letter “A”, how many different items can you find that all begin with “A”? Write them down to create your very own alliteration list poem! Do you think you could make an alliteration list for every letter in the alphabet? Give it a try! 

 

This activity will help your student to: 

1. Recognize Alliteration 

2. Notice Their Surroundings 

3. Organize Objects by Sound 

 

Make sure to share your alliteration lists with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay 

 

Materials for this activity: paper and pen/pencil 

 

Additional Resources: 

All About Alliteration

Alliteration in Literature

Alliteration Ice Cream


May 27, 2020

SPARK Discovery – Science: Bubbles!

Join Ms. Taylor and Simon in this Today’s Play video as they explore the Science of Bubbles! Let’s blow bubbles and do some popping experiments!

 

Definitions:

Bubbles – a thin layer of water sandwiched between 2 layers of soap usually filled with air or other gases.

Surface tension – forces holding the molecules of liquid together

Surface area – the area of the outside part or outermost layer of something

 

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about Liquids and Gases

2. Understand Scientific Principles

3. Conduct an Experiment

 

SPARK Inspiration – Science: Homemade Bubble Solution

Let’s make some Bubbles! Before we can make bubbles, we must make our bubble solution. Use this simple recipe to make some strong viscous bubbles that will stay in the air longer than the normal bubbles you see. All you need are a few ingredients from around your home. First, have an adult heat up a cup of water (a microwave will heat it up enough). Pour the cup of water into your container and add ¼ cup of dish soap and 1 tbsp Glycerin. You can substitute corn syrup if you don’t have glycerin. Stir your mixture SLOWLY so as not to create bubbles. Let your solution cool down and voila, you are ready to make some super bubbles!

 

Materials for this activity: water, dish soap, glycerin or corn syrup

 

This activity will help your student to:

1. Follow a recipe

2. Prepare their own Science Experiments

3. Create a Product

 

SPARK Exploration – Science/Maker: Pyramid Bubble Wand

Why is a bubble round? Bubbles can stretch and become all kinds of crazy looking shapes. But if you seal a bubble by flipping it off your wand, the tension in the bubble skin shrinks to the smallest possible shape for the volume of air it contains. That’s why even if it had a goofy shape before you sealed it, once

sealed shut, the bubble will shrink into a sphere shape. Compared to any other shape, a sphere has the smallest surface area for the amount of volume.

Let’s see if we can create our own bubble maker. We are going to make a tetrahedron or a pyramid . Follow the directions below to create your shape.

Once your shape is created use the bubble solution and SLOWLY dip your pyramid inside. SLOWLY pull your bubble maker out. You should see 4 bubbles that are all meeting in the middle of your pyramid. Before you blow a bubble, observe what shapes you see.

Why do bubbles stick together? Since a bubble tends to minimize its surface area, bubbles will join to share one common wall. Three bubbles will meet at the center, always at an angle of 120 degrees. What happens when you blow a bubble? Does the shape change?

 

Step 1. Cut your straws. First cut each straw in half, then cut in half again. You will get 4 straw sections from each straw.

Step 2. Thread a pipe cleaner through one straw and bend the end of the pipe cleaner to secure it at the end.

Step 3. Thread two more straws onto the pipe cleaner.

Step 4. Bend the long end of the pipe cleaner back to meet the starting point and twist the two ends around each other.

Step 5. Add two more straw sections onto the end of the pipe cleaner.* *Add additional pipe cleaners as necessary and twist the ends together to secure.

Step 6. Thread the pipe cleaner through the opposite corner and down through one of the adjacent straw sections.

Step 7. Add one more straw section and bend it back to one of the straw joints to form a pyramid.

Step 8. Thread the pipe cleaner through an adjacent straw section to secure everything in place. If desired, add a straight section of straw onto the end of the pipe cleaner to form a handle.

 

bubbles.png

Materials for this activity: 2 pipe cleaners, 2 straws, cup, bubble solution, towel

 

Share with us your sundials on social media! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

 

This activity will help your student to:

1. Incorporate Math in Science Understanding

2. Practice Following Directions

3. Experiment with Surface Area

 

 

Additional Resources:

Watch this cool video with more fun bubble activities and info!

Try these other Bubble Recipes to test your own experiment.

Try these fun maker activities all about Bubbles! 


May 26, 2020

 

Topic: Puppets

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Art: Stick Puppets

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn how to create our very own puppets and put on a show!

Materials needed for this activity: construction paper, markers, scissors, glue, craft sticks

This activity will help your student to:

1. Practice Fine Motor Skills

2. Build a Puppet

3. Inspire Imaginative Play

Definitions:

Puppet – a doll moved by hand, string, or wires

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Art: Puppet Theatre

Now that you’ve created your puppets, it’s time to put on a show! But first, we’re going to need a stage. Use an empty cereal box to build your puppet theatre. Have an adult help you cut the top and bottom flaps off the box. Next, cut off one of the large sides. You should be left with a trifold. Finally, cut a large square out of the middle, or largest, section of your box. Viola! You now have a perfect place to perform your show. Feel free to decorate your theatre with shapes, color, even curtains! Make sure to invite everyone to the performance! Well done!

Materials needed for this activity: empty cereal box, scissors, paint and/or markers

Make sure to share your puppet theatres with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Plan and Design

2. Build a Puppet Theatre

3. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Shadow Puppets

Shadow puppets are figures that are placed between a light and a screen. When the puppet is in front of the light it creates a shadow on the paper because it is opaque, meaning no light passes through it. Turn your puppet theatre into a shadow puppet theatre by taping a piece of white paper over the opening. Next, place your theatre in front of a bright light source, such as a lamp or flashlight. Use your stick puppets to put on a shadow show for your audience! Experiment with different types of objects to see what sort of shadows they cast. Can your audience members guess what you are using? This is a fun way to combine theatre and science!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Explore Light & Shadows

2. Create a Shadow Theater

3. Encourage Storytelling

Make sure to share your shadow puppets with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: stick puppets, puppet theatre, white paper, tape, light (flashlight/lamp)

Additional Resources


May 25, 2020

 

Topic: 3D Shapes

Spark Discovery

SPARK  Discovery –  Mathematics:  3D Shapes

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn all about 3D shapes! See if you can guess all shapes along with Simon.

This activity will help your student to: 

1. Identify 3D Shapes

2. Recognize Combinations of 3D Shapes 

3. Create Structures using 3D Shapes

Definitions:  

3D Shape – a shape having three dimensions such as height, width, and depth

Cube – a box shaped object with 6 identical square sides: 6 faces, 12 edges, 8 vertices

Sphere – a 3D object shaped like a ball where every point on the surface is the same distance from the center: 1 face, 1 edge, 0 vertices

Pyramid – a 3D object with a polygon base and triangular sides that meet at a point

Cone – a solid object that has a circular base coined to a point by a curved side: 2 faces, 1 edge, 1 vertex

Cylinder – a solid object with two identical flat ends that are circular and one curved side: 3 faces, 2 edges, 0 vertices

Materials for this activity: playdough, toothpicks, plate

Spark Curiosity

SPARK  Curiosity  - Mathematics: Foldable 3D Models

Now that we’ve learned all about 3D shapes let’s create some at home. Use the worksheets below to practice creating some of the 3D shapes we learned about today. Print out the worksheet you want to create and cut out along the outside of the shape and fold along the dotted lines. Use your tape or glue to bring all of the sides together to create your model! Have fun building!

Find the Foldable 3D Shapes sheet HERE!

Make sure to share your completed shapes with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay 

This activity will help your student to: 

1. Build 3D Shape using a 2D Net  

2. Create 3D Models

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

Materials for this activity: Foldable 3D worksheet, scissors, tape, glue

Spark Inspiration

SPARK  Inspiration – Mathematics: I Spy

Shapes, shapes everywhere! We are surrounded by the 3D shapes we learned from our video. Let’s play I Spy with our friends or family to see who can be the master describer of all things shapes. The goal of the game is to get the other players to guess your object in the least amount of clues possible. Let the spying begin!

Rules of the game:

1. You can only choose objects within seeing distance (no objects in another room).

2. The only descriptions you can use are math related words, so no saying it holds our breakfast for a cereal box. But you could say it has large rectangles on the front and back and smaller rectangles on each of its sides, it is hollow (empty) inside… etc.

3. The person that guesses correctly gets to be the Spy Master next.

4. You begin your description with “I Spy something ….”

5. HAVE FUN! Math can be lots of fun and is surrounding us all the time!

This activity will help your student to: 

1. Recognize Familiar 3D Shapes

2. Interpret Shapes in Everyday Objects

3. Encourage Imagination

Materials for this activity: objects around your home, a friend

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources: 

Learn more about 3D shapes.

Learn a fun song about 3D shapes!

Try this fun game to help at the Shape Factory!

Standards covered in these activities:

K.G.2 Identify and describe a given shape and shapes of objects in everyday situations to include two-dimensional shapes (i.e., triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon, and circle) and three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere).

K.G.3 Classify shapes as two-dimensional/flat or three-dimensional/solid and explain the reasoning used.

K.G.4 Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes of different sizes and orientations using informal language.

K.G.5 Draw two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, and circle) and create models of three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere).

1.G.2 Combine two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, and trapezoid) or three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cube, rectangular prism, cone, and cylinder) in more than one way to form a composite shape.

2.G.1 Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, hexagons, and cubes. Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces.

3.G.4 Identify a three-dimensional shape (i.e., right rectangular prism, right triangular prism, pyramid) based on a given two-dimensional net and explain the relationship between the shape and the net.


Science

 

Topic: Light and Shadows

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science: Light and Shadow!

Join Ms. Taylor and Simon in this Today’s Play video as they explore Light and Shadows! We’ll look at why things create shadows and what happens when light bounces off different objects.

Definitions:

Light – a form of energy that lets us see things around us. The main source of light on earth is the Sun.

Shadows – are dark areas that are created when an opaque object blocks light from a light source.

Transparent – a material that lets almost all light pass through without scattering it.

Translucent – a material that lets some light pass through, but not detailed shapes

Opaque – a material that lets almost no light pass through.

Reflection – when a light ray bounces off a surface, like a mirror.

Refraction – when a light ray is bent as it passes from one medium to another.

Materials for this activity: flashlight, blank background, different objects that are transparent, translucent, and opaque

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about Light

2. Understand Light Properties

3. Understand Scientific Principles

4. Conduct an Experiment

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Science/Maker: Make Your Own Sundial

Have you ever been outside and watched your shadow? Have you ever seen your shadow move throughout the day? The sun, and the rotation of the Earth, can tell us the time! Sundials have been used since ancient times to tell the time using light from the Sun. As the Earth turns, we watch the Sun rise in the East and set in the West. Using this knowledge, we can create our sundial. Follow the steps below to create your very own timekeeper! Check your sundial every hour to mark where the position of the shadow is. You will be able to watch it move throughout the day!

Materials for this activity: stick or pencil, ground or paper plate, tape,

Step 1. If you are making your sundial with a plate, find the very center and poke a hole with your pencil only big enough for the pencil to stand up in. See Step 2 of these directions for using the ground as your template.

Step 2. With your pencil sticking up through the middle of the plate, take both outside and find an open sunny area that gets sunlight throughout the day. Place your plate flat on the ground. If using the ground, push your pencil into the ground until it can stand upright.

Step 3. To make your sundial more accurate, use a compass to find North (on any phone there is a compass app) tilt your pencil slightly towards the north direction and either draw a tick mark at the top of the plate, or mark it on the ground in the direction of North.

Step 4. At the next hour mark on a clock check your dial to observe where the shadow is created on your sundial. Put a mark on your plate on in the dirt. You can use stones or lines in the dirt as your markers. Check back each hour to see how much your dial has moved. Create marks all around your plate or ground until you have each hour marked off.

Step 5. Now that you have calibrated your sundial try it out the next day to test the accuracy of your project! How close are you to the times you marked before?

Share with us your sundials on social media! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Conduct Scientific Inquiry

2. Enhance World Understanding

3. Create a Scientific Tool

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Science: Create a Rainbow

Have you ever seen a rainbow? Rainbows are beautiful and inspiring. Let’s look at the world around us to see if we can find these beautiful arcs of light. Rainbows are created by refraction, or the bending of light as a light ray travels from one medium to another. Like when you see a rainbow in the sky this is the light in the air traveling through the water droplets in the sky. When white light hits these water droplets it is bent and the different wavelengths of light are split into the colors of the rainbow that we see or ROYGBIV: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet!

Let’s see how we can refract light! What do you think you could use to bend light? Try different objects around your home and shine a light through them. What qualities allow more light to pass through or bend the light? Is there a difference in the light being refracted or reflected?

To get you started try filling up a clear glass with water. Then shine a flashlight through it at different angles to see if you can bend the light. Try sticking a pencil inside to see what happens to the light that is reflected off the pencil. Use your inventive side to come up with new ways of refracting and reflecting light!

Materials for this activity: flashlight, clear cup, water, pencil, mirrors, glasses, windows, etc.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Use Scientific Principles

2. Create an Understanding of the World Around them

3. Experiment with Reflection and Refraction

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Check out this video with Bill Nye for more on Light!

For more info on Light click here.

Check out these fun activities with Shadows

Standards covered in these activities:

First Grade Science: 1.P.2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties of light and how shadows are formed.

Fourth Grade Science:

4.E.3B.3 Construct explanations of how the Sun appears to move throughout the day using observations of shadows.

4.P.4A. Light, as a form of energy, has specific properties including color and brightness. Light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object. The way light reacts when it strikes an object depends on the object’s properties.

4.P.4A.5 Plan and conduct scientific investigations to explain how light behaves when it strikes transparent, translucent, and opaque materials.


 

Topic: Colors

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science: Walking Colors

Join Ms. Taylor and Simon in Today’s Play video as they try a colorful experiment to make colors walk! We’ll learn about the mixing of colors and how colors can be mixed to create more colors.

Materials for this activity: clear cups, water, food coloring, paper towels

Definitions:

Primary color – red, blue, and yellow colors; colors that cannot be mixed from other colors

Secondary color – colors mixed from 2 primary colors, like purple, orange, and green.

Capillary Action - the ability of a liquid to flow into narrow spaces without the help of extra forces (like gravity)

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about color mixing

2. Understand Scientific Principles

3. Comprehending Science through Practical Application

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity – Science/Maker: Create a Color Wheel

Now that you have completed your experiment let’s document our findings through art. Use the template below to create each of our Primary and Secondary colors on our Color Wheel. A Color wheel is used to show the relationships between the colors. You can use paint, crayons, or colored pencils to complete your wheel. Only begin with the 3 primary colors: red, blue, and yellow. Paint the area of each primary color with the paint. Next take a small bit of each primary color and add it to the 2 boxes next to it. Mix them together to see what happens! You should create your secondary colors! In the very center take a small bit of all the colors and mix them together. What happens? Did it turn brown or black? When you mix all the colors together, they mix to from black. Complimentary colors are colors that are on the opposite side of the wheel from each other. Can you figure out which colors are complimentary on your wheel?

Find your Color Wheel Template here.

Materials for this activity: template, red, yellow, and blue colors in paint or crayon

This activity will help your student to:

1. Investigate Color Mixing

2. Combine Science and Art

3. Identify Primary and Secondary Colors

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Science: A Colorful World

When you walk outside what do you see? Green Leaves, Yellow bees, blue sky! There are colors all around us! Let’s see how many different colors we can find. Use your completed color wheel to see what you can find on your next adventure outside. Can you make a list of all the things you find that are each color? What color did you find the most? Was there a color that was hard to find?

Materials for this activity: finished template, pencil, paper

This activity will help your student to:

1. Observe the Natural World

2. Understand Color Relationships

3. Practice Observational Skills


 

Topic: Chromatography

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery - Science: Shamrock Chromatography

Let's make a colorful Shamrock! Explore how colors are separated as we experiment with Chromatography.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Understand Color Mixing
  • Hone Fine Motor Skills
  • Expand Vocabulary
  • Explore Science Based Techniques
  • Encourage Scientific Exploration

Chromatography is a set of lab techniques used to separate mixtures. Different parts of the mixtures will travel at different speeds causing them to separate.

To start, gather your materials. You will need: a coffee filter (or white paper towel), markers, a cup of water, pipe cleaner (or a green string)

Now let’s get learning! Begin by folding your coffee filter in half and put 6-8 colored dots (black works the best but try some other colors to test your results). Once you have placed your dots around the middle of your filter fold it 2 more times until it looks like a piece of pizza.

Next, place the folded filter, tip down, into the beaker. You should only have about a cm of water at the bottom. We don’t want to soak our filter but have just enough to soak up.

Watch the filter and the water. What is happening? The water is traveling through the filter and spreading the colors. Watch what happens for a few minutes. This effect is called capillary action, or the ability of a liquid to flow into narrow spaces without the help of extra forces (like gravity).

After the water has reached the top of your filter, pull it out and lay it on a paper towel. What changed about your colors? Why did the colors do this? It’s all about molecule size. Everything around you is made of molecules. Molecules are tiny shapes that squish together to make up everything on earth – even things you can’t see like the air! These molecules can be big or small depending on what materials make them up. Different molecules of the same stuff – marker ink – can be very different sizes. So, the reason you see some colors move quicker than others is because of the size of the molecules of that color. Which colors have big molecules and which have small ones?

Did you say that red has big molecules and blue has small ones? That is the case! The blue molecules are so small and fast moving that they get to the top of the water. Yellow is a little bigger and slower, and red is so big that it lags behind.

Now that we know the science let’s finish our shamrock. After it has dried lay your filter on a flat surface. Take your fingers and create 3 pinches around the circle and pull to the middle to create your

shamrock shape. After you have your 3-leaf clover shape wrap the pipe cleaner around each leaf and voila, you have your own colorful shamrock. Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination - Leprechaun Trap

Have you ever wanted to catch a leprechaun so you can get his pot of gold? Today is the day! Your child will love creating their own unique trap(s) from objects in your home. You will love all the learning that comes from this STEAM based play. There is no right way to catch a leprechaun, so get your creativity going.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Hone Fine Motor Skills
  • Improve Problem-Solving Skil
  • Expand Imagination
  • Teach Focus and Patience
  • Encourage Cooperative Play
  • Boost Confidence

Leprechaun Trap Ideas: To make your own leprechaun trap, here are some elements you may want to include.

  • Decorations – use green construction paper to cut out Shamrocks, decorate signs saying “free gold,” or color a rainbow leading to the trap. Decoration can be ued to attract your leprechaun or camouflage the trap.
  • Bait – lucky charms, gold coins or fake gold can be your bait for the leprechaun!
  • A Trapping Mechanism (or how you will trap the leprechaun) – Will you use a trap door, a falling cage, or something even better? Brainstorm different ways you can make the trap. This is where you can develop a love for engineering.
  • An Alarm - don’t give the leprechaun time to get away. Create an alert so you know when the trap has sprung.

How to Get Started

1. Gather Supplies.

Some Suggestions

  • Empty tissue paper box or other items in your recycle bin.
  • String, Yarn or Ribbon
  • Popsicle sticks or real sticks from trees
  • Jars, pots and pans or plastic food storage containers
  • Toys
  • Hats (they make a good cage)
  • Construction Paper
  • Tape
  • Scissors

2. Make A Plan. Kids can have fun planning and designing their trap beforehand. Have your child first draw out a design or two and have them walk you through it. Ask questions to help them think about their design and how it can be built.

3. Build It. Practice scissor skills, how to use the “right” amount of tape, and much more.

4. Test It. There is only one way to see if it works. Act out with your child what the leprechaun might do and see if your trap is ready.

5. Improve It. The best engineers don’t give-up but improve upon their work until they get to the desired result. Get back to the drawing board or make a few tweaks to get it just right.

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity - Math: The Lucky 3

As St. Patrick was teaching in Ireland, he looked to the objects around him for things in groups of 3. He found the 3-leaf clover. So, the 3 leaf clover came to represent St. Patrick’s day. Look around your house to see how many groups of 3 you can find. What other number of objects can you find? How many chairs around your table, or how many books on your shelf?

This activity will help your student to:

  • Practice Counting
  • Compare and Contrast Objects
  • Correlate Number Words to Physical Amounts
  • Locate Patterns


Additional Activities & Resources

Additional Activity Ideas

As the saying goes, everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day. But how many Americans are actually of Irish descent? According to the 2018 U.S. Census, about 32 million Americans, or about 10 percent of the population, claim to have Irish heritage. Whether or not your family can trace roots to the Emerald Isle, St. Patrick's Day is a great time to talk about or look up your family history.

Additional St. Patrick’s Day Resources

Learn More About St. Patrick’s Day

Print Free Worksheets for Each Grade Level


Topic: Dinosaurs & Fossils

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Literacy: Dino Story time with Simon

Join us for Story Time with our Paleontologists Kendal and Simon as we venture through Dino land! Watch our video below to explore with us on Dino Day.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Develop Their Imagination
  • Expand Vocabulary
  • Improve Concentration Skills
  • Exercises Their Brain
  • Progress Language Development

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery - Science: Dinosaur Bones

Explore like a Paleontologist on our Dinosaur Day EdVenture!

This activity will help your student to:

  • Hone Fine Motor Skills
  • Expand Vocabulary
  • Understand the World Around Them
  • Explore Science Based Techniques
  • Encourage Scientific Exploration

A Paleontologist is a scientist who studies fossils, or the preserved remains of animals or plants that were once living. Fossils can be found deep within the Earth. Paleontologists dig them up and analyze their contents. These scientists also examine different parts of a fossil to understand the lifestyle, diet, growth, and movement of a plant or animal when it was alive. Dinosaurs are one type animal that Paleontologists study. These giants have fascinated us for hundreds of years, from the ferocious T-Rex, to the gentle Apatosaurus, we are always looking for more clues into their mysterious world.

Today let’s explore like a Paleontologist with dinosaur bones! Dinosaur fossils are rarely fully intact so scientists must use the information they have to create what they think the missing pieces looked like. Sometimes they will combine different fossils into one to create a full skeleton. Let’s see if we can complete a whole dinosaur skeleton, like a puzzle.

Materials Needed: dried pasta, glue, dinosaur skeleton template (download here).

Here is a guideline for various types of noodles to use for different parts of your dinosaur skeleton. If you don’t have all of them feel free to swap for any other kinds as well.

Shell: for the skull

Elbow (Macaroni): for the neck, backbone, and tail

Fettucini: for the ribs

Rigatoni: for the legs

Once you have your template ready to go, begin by placing your noodles where you want them before adding your glue. When all your bones have been placed, start at the head and add a line of glue for each of your bones to hold them in place. Then step back and let it dry while you observe your very own dinosaur skeletons. Paleontologists would be proud of your hard work.

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity - Art: Playdough Dinosaurs

Use playdough and items from around your home to create your very own dinosaur. You can use noodles, beads, cupcake holders, googly eyes, etc. to create your version of your favorite dinosaur. Take a picture and share it with us on Facebook! #TodaysPlay #EdVenture

This activity will help your student to:

  • Explore their Imagination
  • Boost Creativity
  • Invent new purposes for objects
  • Enhance Love of Learning
  • Develop Fine Motor Skills

Topic: Sound, Volume, & Vibration


Topic: Parts of Plants & Uses of Plants

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Science: Parts of a Plant

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Taylor and Simon as we explore the Parts of a Flowering Plant!

This activity will help your student to:

  • Understand the World Around Them
  • Identify where food comes from
  • Learn Benefits of Plants
  • Explore Science Vocabulary

Importance of the Parts of the flowering Plant:

  • Roots absorb water and nutrients from the ground and into the plant, as well as hold the plant in the soil. Ex. Carrots
  • Stems transport the water and nutrients from the roots to the rest of the plant. They also hold up the leaves, flowers, and fruits. Ex. Celery
  • Leaves provide food and air so the plant can grow and be healthy. They use a process called “photosynthesis” to turn light energy into food. Ex. Lettuce
  • Flowers are usually at the top of the plant that blossoms and produces pollen an eventually turns into the fruit. Ex. Broccoli
  • Fruits contain the seeds of the flowering plant and develop from the plant’s flowers. These seeds will eventually grow into new plants. Ex. Orange

Can you complete this fun coloring handout to help Simon ID the 4 main parts of the flowering plant? Use the 4-parts Simon learned in our video to complete your very own flower diagram: roots, stem, leaf, flower.

Download HERE.

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery

Let’s explore our homes and the world around us to see what we can find. Now that we have learned the 4 parts of the plant let’s identify each one.

Open your fridge and see how many plants you can find! Can you find each plant part inside? Look at the video if you need a reminder of different examples of each type.

Go on an adventure! In your backyard or on a small walk with your family, can you point out different plants? Can you find different types of trees? What looks different about them? Size, shape, leaves, colors? Can you find flowers? Do they look different? Colors, number of petals, how many?

Take a picture of your favorite plant you found and share it with us on social media! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

  • Engage with Nature
  • Identify Natural Objects
  • Encourage Scientific Exploration
  • Exploring their Own Environment

Additional Resources

Additional Resources:

Test your knowledge of the plant parts with this mystery quiz:

https://web.extension.illinois.edu/gpe/case1/c1m1a.html

Try some of these Gardening Activities:

https://kidsgardening.org/garden-activities/

Why is gardening good for your child?

https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/gardening-with-kids-how-it-affects-your-childs-brain-body-and-soul


Topic: Clouds, Precipitation, & Meteorologist

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Science: Clouds – Making it Rain

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Taylor and Simon as we explore clouds! We’ll learn how you can create your very own colorful rain cloud.

Share with us how your experiment turned out! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about Weather

2. Understand the Natural World

3. Explain Common Phenomena

Definitions:

Weather – the combination of sunlight, precipitation, wind, and temperature in a certain place and time.

Meteorologist – a scientist who studies weather

Clouds – made up of large groups of tiny water droplets or ice crystals that form when air cools.

Precipitation – any form of water that comes from the sky. Ex: rain, sleet, or snow,

Materials for this activity: clear cup, water, shaving cream, coloring, spoon or eye dropper

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science: Cloud in a Jar

Now that we understand how clouds make it rain, let’s look at how clouds form!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Observe Scientific Phenomenon

2. Conduct an Experiment

3. Encourage Scientific Exploration

To get started grab the materials needed for this experiment. Using hot water from the sink, fill a clear jar a ¼ full. Swirl it around to heat up the inside of the jar. Place the lid upside down on top of the jar so it forms a little cup. Let the jar sit for about 10 seconds. Then lift the lid off and spray 1 or 2 sprays of hairspray into the jar. Replace the lid immediately so the vapor doesn’t escape. Place a few ice cubes on top of the lid and let sit for 1 min. Watch the inside of the jar to see what happens. After 1 min lift the lid to watch as your cloud escapes.

What’s happening here? As the hot water turns to vapor in the jar it will begin to condense once it reaches the colder lid. But you cannot see anything because there is nothing for the water droplets to stick to yet. Enter the hairspray. Clouds form around dust and other very tiny particles in the sky. The hairspray represents these particles giving the water vapor somewhere to collect so your cloud can be visible!

Materials for this activity: mason jar or clear jar with lid, hot water, ice, hairspray

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity – Art: Create a Cloud

Clouds come in all shapes and sizes. Let’s use some household materials to create our very own cloud. Use your imagination to create shapes you might see in the sky.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Understand Cloud Types

2. Inspire Creativity

3. Combine Science and Art

Think about a cloud you have seen before. Was it puffy, tall, wide, grey, or wispy? Clouds can look very different. The three main types of clouds are cumulus, cirrus, and stratus.

Cumulus clouds are the puffy cotton candy like clouds. Cirrus are the wispy high clouds. Stratus clouds are like a blanket across the sky.

Use your cotton balls to see how you could make these 3 types of clouds. Try pulling the cotton balls apart to make wispy cirrus clouds, lumping them together to create cumulus, or pulling them apart and laying them across the paper in lines to create stratus clouds. How else could you create clouds? Use your creativity to create some other cloud formations as well.

Share your finished fluffy clouds with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: colored paper, cotton balls or white material, glue

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Science: Weather Tracker

Meteorologists collect data daily to track weather patterns. It is important for everyone to be prepared for the weather and it is a Meteorologists job to keep them ready for what lies ahead. Try your hand at being a meteorologist by collecting your very own weather data. Use the sheet below as your daily weather tracker. See if you can predict what tomorrow’s weather has in store!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Observe Weather Patterns

2. Data Collection Skills

Materials for this activity: Weather Tracker handout (download here) and writing utensil

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Check this out for more information on Cloud Formation

https://climatekids.nasa.gov/cloud-formation/

Play these fun weather games and more!

https://www.brainpop.com/games/game-finder/?game_keyword=topic:%20Clouds&topic_id=fae91d5dac5d5191

Clouds are all around! Take a look at the main types we see in the skies.

https://web.extension.illinois.edu/treehouse/clouds.cfm?Slide=5 https://www.weather.gov/jetstream/corefour

Explore the Water cycle

https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle-kids-beg.html


Standards covered in today’s activities:

2.E.2A.1 Analyze and interpret data from observations and measurements to describe local weather conditions

2.E.2A.2 Analyze local weather data to predict daily and seasonal patterns over time.

4.E.2A. Conceptual Understanding: Earth’s atmosphere is a mixture of gases, including water vapor and oxygen. The movement of water, which is found almost everywhere on Earth including the atmosphere, changes form and cycles between Earth’s surface and the air and back again. This cycling of water is driven by energy from the Sun. The movement of water in the water cycle is a major pattern that influences weather conditions. Clouds form during this cycle and various types of precipitation result.

4.E.2A.2 Develop and use models to explain how water changes as it moves between the atmosphere and Earth’s surface during each phase of the water cycle (in part).


Topic: Types of Rocks, Minerals, & Geology

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science: How rocks form!

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Taylor and Simon as we explore Rocks and Minerals! Become a Geologist as we investigate the 3 types of rocks and how they are formed.

Definitions:

Rocks – a solid earth materials made up of 1 or more minerals.

Minerals – a solid found in the earth that is naturally found, not made by something living, and made up of only one type of material that is usually found in a crystal structure.

Sedimentary Rock – rocks that are formed over a long time by the layering of sediments (broken up pieces of existing rocks)

Igneous Rock – these rocks form from the cooling and hardening of lava or magma. They can form inside the crust or on the top.

Metamorphic Rock – these rocks from when other rocks are put under intense pressure and/or heat.

Geologist – a scientist who studies the rocks and minerals that make up the earth’s crust.

Try an activity like the one Simon did in the video to show how sedimentary rock is formed!

Materials for this activity: rocks, pebbles, sand, water, plastic bottle (with lid)

Reuse a plastic or glass bottle, keep the lid, and place some different sized rocks, pebbles and sand to fill it half-way full. Fill up the rest of the bottle with water until it is about ¾ full. Now shake it well! Place the bottle on a flat surface and watch as the dust settles, literally. See how the different sized minerals create layers within your bottle. You can see how each layer stacks on top of each other just like sedimentary rocks are created, but over a much, much longer time frame.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about the Rock Cycle

2. Understand Material Science

3. Explain Natural Phenomena

Spark Exloration

SPARK Exploration – Science: Rockin’ Rocks!

Geologists are scientists that study the Earth and what makes up the world we live on. Let’s explore today like our scientists do to understand the characteristics that make rocks and minerals the same but also different. We are going to practice our powers of observation with this quest for rock genius.

Take a trip outside, with your parent’s permission of course, to collect some rocks from our very own neighborhoods. See how many different shapes, sizes, and colors you can find. Collect them into a bag to bring back so we can examine them like our fellow geologists. Once we are back inside let’s see if we can find some items around our house that might be made of rocks and minerals as well. Add them to your cache of items. See if you can find these items around your house: pencil (with graphite), granite countertops, glass cup, anything metal, ceramic pot, chalk, or salt.

Now that you have gathered different rocks and minerals, take a look and describe the characteristics of our different items. Use the sheet below to keep track of all your information so you can compare and contrast your different pieces. Good luck rockin’ & rollin!

Materials for this activity: assortment of rocks, minerals, and objects from the home, worksheet, pencil, markers or crayons.

Find the worksheet HERE!

Check out this website for more details about rocks and minerals in our daily lives.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Conduct Scientific Inquiry

2. Practice Observation Skills

3. Describe Properties of Materials

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Art: Grow your own crystal!

Most minerals form naturally as crystals. With this experiment for the whole family you can grow your very own crystals. Make sure to have adult supervision as you begin this project. Follow the steps below to grow some beautiful mineral crystals.

Materials for this activity: table salt (additional options: alum, Epsom salt), clear cup, water, spoon or pencil, string, boiling pot for the water (do not attempt without adult supervision), food coloring* optional

1. You will need a 1:1 ratio of water to solid for this experiment. The table salt takes the longest to form of the 3 listed above (iodized won’t work as well as regular salt either). Gather your supplies and measure out your water. A good amount to start with is about ½ cup water. This means you need to measure out a ½ cup salt as well. Don’t combine yet.

2. *ADULT STEP ONLY* Have an adult take a microwave safe glass and heat up the ½ cup water until it is almost boiling (approx. 1 min). Remove very carefully and keep little hands away from not surfaces.

3. Add 1 drop of food coloring of your choice if you would like to make your crystal turn a certain color.

4. While the water is still hot pour in the salt about a tablespoon at a time while stirring the whole time. Keep adding salt until you can begin to see the grains staying on the bottom. As long as they continue to disappear keep adding more. We are making a supersaturated solution, meaning we are putting more salt into the water than can be broken up and mixed (dissolved) into the water.

5. Pour your salt solution into your clear jar.

6. Take your string and if it isn’t a thick piece then you can braid it or twist it to create a better crystal. Now take your piece of string and tie it around the middle of your pencil or spoon. Make sure the string is long enough to go into the water but not touch the bottom.

7. Then place the spoon across the top of the jar with the string extending into the hot water.

8. Place your jar in a place where it will not be disturbed. Check in with your experiment every few hours to see how it is developing. Be patient. Good Science takes time. It may take a few days for the water to evaporate enough and the crystals to form. Keep your experiment going for as long as you like to see how big a crystal you can form!

Share with us your crystal-clear results! #Edventure #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Use Scientific Principles

2. Conduct an Experiment

3. Create Art Through Science

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Why does the Earth Rock?

Explore more with these fun interactive videos and activities

Standards covered in today’s activities:

Kindergarten Science: K.P.4A. Objects can be described and classified by their observable properties, by their uses, and by whether they occur naturally or are manufactured (human-made). Different properties of objects are suited for different purposes.

First Grade Science: 1.E.4B.1 Obtain and communicate information to summarize how natural resources are used in different ways (suck as soil and water to grow plants; rocks to make roads, walls or buildings; or sand to make glass).

Third Grade Science: 3.E.4A.1 Analyze and interpret data from observations and measurements to describe and compare different Earth materials (including rocks, minerals, and soil) and classify each type of material based on its distinct physical properties.


Topic: Recycling, Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, & Composting

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – It’s Earth Day!

IT’S EARTH DAY! Let’s celebrate our beautiful planet on the 50th Earth Day. Join Simon and Ms. Taylor as they look at some ways we can help care for our Earth.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about Earth Day

2. Encourage Ways to Save Resources

3. Introduce the 4 R’s

Definitions:

Refuse – to not take waste that you do not have to use, like straws or utensils.

Reduce – to use less of a good or creating less waste

Reuse – to find a new purpose for an already used object

Recycle – using old products, breaking them down to form something new

Compost – nature’s way of breaking down products which can be created at home to breakdown naturally occurring products

What can you do to help celebrate Earth Day this year? What can you do all year long? By changing our habits one at a time we can make an even bigger impact creating a positive change in our planet.

Check out this link for more information about Composting in your own home!

Spark – Neighborhood Clean-up

SPARK – Neighborhood Clean-up

What better is there to celebrate Earth Day than by helping to keep or planet clean! On your daily walk, take a few extra things with you to make a big difference in your own neighborhood. Take 2 plastic bags and gloves (if you have them) along with you on your walk. With your parents' permission, make it your mission to find anything that doesn’t belong! A candy bar wrapper, a bottle, a chip bag… all of these things are types of litter. So do your part and help clean it up! You mission begins today, help solve the litter problem.

Never use your bare hands to pick up litter, and never touch glass or objects your parents tell you not too. Instead use a plastic bag, gloves, a scoop, or pinchers to pick up litter from the ground.

You can even make your missions once a month to create an even bigger impact on your neighborhood. Can you recruit others to help you on your mission to protect the environment?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn Respect for their Surroundings

2. Cleanup their Environment

3. Recognize Litter and its Effects

Spark Invention

SPARK Invention - Reuse

Let’s see what we can invent by reusing things around your home! We would love to see what you can come up with to repurpose random objects bound for the trash bin. Can you turn a plastic jug into a work of art? Or a paper towel tube into a bird feeder? Here’s a few ideas to get started and let’s see where your imagination takes you from there.

Share with us your beautiful reused, recycled creations! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Use Your Imagination

2. Repurpose Used Items

3. Encourage Reinvention of Objects

To build a vase take a clean plastic jug and with parent supervision cut the top off. Once you have a clean slate you can use any materials around you to decorate your jug into a beautiful vase! Maybe by taking paint or scrapes of colored paper and glue you can create a colorful vase to place some flowers you found on a nature walk.

To make a bird feeder you’ll need a toilet paper or paper towel roll, string, peanut butter, and bird seed. First feed the string through the roll and tie a long knot so you have enough to hang it up outside. Then use a spoon to spread a layer of peanut butter around all of the roll. After that place some bird seed on a plate and roll your covered roll around in the bird seed until it is mostly covered. Now all you have to do is find a branch to hang your feeder outside for all of the birds to enjoy. See how many different birds come to visit your feeder!

Materials: recycled materials, paint, glue, paper, scissors, peanut butter, bird seed, string


Topic: Acids & Bases, pH Scale

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science: Potions Day!

Join Professor Taylor and Wizard Simon in Today’s Play video as they look at mysterious color changing potions!! Let’s experiment with acids and bases and indicators to see some beautiful colors.

Definitions:

pH scale – Used to measure how acidic or basic a liquid is. pH is a number from 0 to 14. From 0 to 7 are acids, with 0 being the strongest. From 7 to 14 are bases with 14 being the strongest base. If a liquid has a pH of 7, it's neutral.

Acid – a liquid that has a lot of positive hydrogen ions(H+), something with a sour taste, like vinegar, citrus, stomach acid

Base – a liquid that has a lot of negative hydroxide ions(OH-), something with a soapy bitter taste, like baking soda, ammonia, bleach, soap

Indicator - something used to identify an acid or base by changing to different colors when either is present.

Remember to always have a parent or chaperone present when dealing with magical potions!

If the cabbage indicator turns red or pink – It’s an ACID!

If the cabbage indicator turns blue, green, or yellow – It’s a BASE!

If the cabbage indicator stays purple – It is NEUTRAL

Materials for this activity: red cabbage, clear cups, water, blender, household liquids (lemon juice, vinegar, baking soda, water, soapy water, soda, milk), blender, hot water, strainer, container

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about Acids and Bases

2. Understand Scientific Principles

3. Comprehending Science through Practical Application

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Science/Maker: Transfiguration Flowers

Flowers are always beautiful but what if you could change the color whenever you wanted!! Well you can with these ‘Transfiguration Flowers’! Follow the steps below to make your very own.

Materials for this activity: coffee filters, cabbage indicator, pipe cleaner or stick, vinegar, soapy water, spray bottle, plate

Step 1. Grab your supplies and begin with a few coffee filters (the more you use the fuller your flower will be) and some of the left over cabbage indicator from your other experiment.

Step 2. Place your coffee filters on a plate or a tray and lay them flat. Pour some cabbage juice indicator over top of the flowers to lightly cover and soak them.

Step 3. Pour off the excess liquid and let the coffee filter dry completely.

Step 4. Now its flower time! Take the dry coffee filters and place them all on top of one another. Fold them in half to create a semi-circle, then fold once more to create a piece of pizza.

Step 5. Take a pipe cleaner or a stick (with tape) and wrap the pipe cleaner around the pointed tip of the filters. Or wrap the filters around a stick with tape. Then gently fan the different layers to create your flower.

Step 6. Time to transform! Fill a spray bottle with an acid like vinegar. Now spray the flower and watch the magic happen!! Change the color anytime by spritzing your flower with either an acid or a base.

Show us your finished flowers on social media! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Conduct Scientific Inquiry

2. Combine Science and Art

3. Identify Acids and Bases from Colors

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Science: Penny Experiment

Have you ever seen a super dirty penny before and wondered how in the world can I get this clean! Well let’s look at our acids and bases to help us sold our problem. First, you’ll need to find a few of those dirty pennies, maybe check the couch! Once you have your pennies it’s time to get them cleaned up.

Find some liquids around your home that you know to be acidic, like vinegar or lemon juice, and others that you know to be basic, like baking soda in water or soapy water. Place a small amount, just enough to cover the bottom into each cup. Now its time for the coins. Put one penny into each liquid so that one side will get really clean and you can observe the difference. Let your acids or bases work their magic and see what happens! What are your results? Did the acids or the bases work better to remove the tarnish?

Materials for this activity: dirty pennies, clear cups, acidic liquids, basic liquids

This activity will help your student to:

1. Use Scientific Principles

2. Conduct an Experiment

3. Practice Observational Skills


Topic: Magnetism

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science: Magnet Day!

Join Ms. Taylor and Simon in this Today’s Play video as they explore the Mysteries of Magnets! Learn about the power of the magnetic field and watch as we make things move without touching them!

Definitions:

Magnet – any object that produces a magnetic field and repels or attracts certain metals (iron, nickel, cobalt) or other magnets

Attract – to pull closer

Repel – to push away

Magnetic Field – the space surrounding a magnet or an object carrying an electric current

Materials for this activity: items from your home (magnetic and non-magnetic), magnet

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about Magnetism

2. Understand Scientific Principles

3. Experiment through Trial and Error

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Science/Maker: Make Your Own Refrigerator Magnet

Magnets are all around us, we use them to hold things up! You probably have magnets on your refrigerator that hold pictures, artwork, letters, all sorts of things. Let’s see if we can create our own beautiful refrigerator magnet.

Materials for this activity: paper, cardboard, crayons/markers, scissors, bottle cap or circular template, pencil, magnet, glue stick.

Step 1. Grab your supplies and begin by creating your template. Choose the size circle you want like a bottle cap size and trace the circle with a pencil onto both the cardboard and the paper. Then cut both circles out with the scissors.

Step 2. Now use your imagination of what you can create with your circle piece of paper. Draw your design onto your paper.

Step 3. Once your design is complete flip the paper to the back and add some glue all around. Glue the paper to the cardboard backing to give it some support.

Step 4. Lastly, put a bit of glue in the center of the back of the cardboard and attach the magnet right in the center. Try it on your frig to see if it attracts or repels! What can you hold up with your new magnet creation?

Show us your magnificent magnets on social media! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Conduct Scientific Inquiry

2. Combine Science and Art

3. Use their Imagination


Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Science: Create a Compass

Compasses have been used for thousands of years to navigate the world. Because our world has a magnetic field, there is a magnetic North Pole and a magnetic South Pole. These poles allow us to find them using the small but powerful pull they have on other magnets. Let’s see if we can create a simple magnet using only supplies from our homes!

Materials for this activity: bowl, water, sewing needle or paperclip, strong magnet, tissue paper, pen

Step 1. Grab your supplies and fill a clear bowl with water.

Step 2. Cut out a circle about 1.5 in in diameter from the tissue paper. Feel free to label one end N and one end S so that it looks like a real compass.

Step 3. Prepare your compass needle by grabbing either the sewing needle (only with parent supervision) or paperclip, which needs to be unfolded into a line. With the strongest magnet you have, rub one half of the needle 20-30 times to magnetize the end. Now do the same thing with the reverse side of the magnet, or the other pole, and with the opposite end of your needle.

Step 4. Once your needle is magnetized, thread it gently through the tissue paper 2 times so it will be held in place. The ends of the needle should line up with the N and S letters.

Step 5. Now you are ready to try your compass out! Very carefully and gentle place the tissue paper and needle onto the top of the water. The needle should begin to turn until it finds north. Try using another magnet to get your compass to move.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Use Scientific Principles

2. Create Scientific Tools

3. Experiment with Magnetic Fields

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Find out more about Magnets!

Where to find Magnets in your home!

Standards covered in these activities:

Kindergarten Science: K.P.4A.1 Analyze and interpret data to compare the qualitative properties of objects (such as size, shape, color, texture, weight, flexibility, attraction to magnets, or ability to sink or float) and classify objects based on similar properties.

Second Grade Science: 2.P.3B. Conceptual Understanding: Magnets are a specific type of solid that can attract and repel certain other kinds of materials, including other magnets. There are some materials that are neither attracted to nor repelled by magnets. Because of their special properties, magnets are used in various ways.

Third Grade Science: 3.P.3B. Conceptual Understanding: Magnets can exert forces on other magnets or magnetizable materials causing energy transfer between them, even when the objects are not touching. An electromagnet is produced when an electric current passes through a coil of wire wrapped around an iron core. Magnets and electromagnets have unique properties.

Fifth Grade Science: 5.P.2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the physical properties of matter and mixtures.


Tech - Engineering

 

Topic: Robots

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Engineering: Computer Coding

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Simon as we become Programmers and use problem solving skills to get our robot through the maze!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Practice Engineering Principles

2. Understand Basic Computer Coding

3. Explain Coding and Computer Language

Definitions:

Coding – sometimes called programming refers to the process of creating step-by-step instructions for a computer or machine to follow that are in a language it can understand.

Programmer – someone who develops and creates the code or program.

Binary – the original language used by computers which consists only of 1’s and 0’s or ON or OFF.

Spark Innovation

SPARK Innovation – Engineering: Eddie’s Coding Challenge

Can you help Eddie through his adventure at EdVenture? Using the worksheet below use the “codes” or the arrows to give Eddie precise instructions to complete his mission. He needs to pass through all of the stops along the way before getting to the end! If you complete this challenge take it to the next level!! Computer programmers are all about finding the simplest solution, so can you find the simplest set of directions through the course using the least amount of codes (arrows).

This activity will help your student to:

1. Creating Coding Instructions

2. Develop Problem Solving Skills

3. Work like a Programmer

Materials for this activity: template (HERE), scissors

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Engineering: Become a Programmer

Practice makes Perfect! What better way to learn about computers, programming, and coding than through playing a game! Check out the games below that are both fun and teach you the coding process.

Materials for this activity: Computer, your brain!

Lightbot is an interactive, progressive coding game for elementary students

Blockly is an intensive programming game for ages 8 and up.

Code Karts is for those who like apps on the go! Take your coding with you!


 

Topic: Bridge Building

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Engineering: Building Bridges

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Taylor and Simon as we become Engineers and use our design skills to build our own bridges!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Practice Engineering Principles

2. Demonstrate Inventive Process

3. Explain Engineering Models

Definitions:

Bridge – a structure built to span a physical obstacle like a river, valley, or bay.

Engineer – someone who invents, designs, builds and tests structures and other machines.

Beam Bridge – a simple bridge with 1 support on each end with a beam connecting the 2 supports

Arch Bridge - a bridge with supports at each end that arch either over or underneath the middle of the bridge easing the tension on the beam.

Suspension Bridge – a bridge with tall towers that support wires and cables attached to the beam which spread out the weight across the bridge evenly.

Materials for this activity: 2 heavy objects, blocks, paper, pencils, string, tape, scissors, straw (bendable object), coins

Spark Innovation

SPARK Innovation – Engineering: The Shape Matters

When Engineers are designing structures like bridges it is very important for them to investigate the strongest shapes which provide the best support. Different shapes like rectangles, triangles and curves are used a lot in construction. Let’s see if we can investigate which shapes will create the strongest bridge when using the same materials.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Identify Measurable Attributes of Everyday Objects

2. Investigate Engineering Process

3. Critical Thinking Skills

4. Solve Real-world Math Problems

Using only cards or index cards and tape can you construct different bridges using different shapes to see which shape creates the strongest bridge. You can test how strong they are by placing coins, rocks, paperclips, etc. on top to measure how much weight your bridges can hold.

Build a 2 triangle bases with the point sticking up. You can tape the cards together. Then place cards between the 2 bases to connect your bridge. Now begin placing your weight on top, one by one, to count how much weight it can hold. Repeat this for other shapes like a standing rectangle or many arches (bend the card and tape to a flat bottom).

Which shape was able to hold up the most weight? Did this take multiple tries to get correct? You had to use the engineering process to understand the best possible method of building!

How would this help you to build a sturdy bridge that was even bigger? Can you take it to the next level and create a larger model using paper or blocks?

Materials for this activity: cards or index cards, tape, coins

Spark Ingenuity

SPARK Ingenuity – Engineering: Strength Matters!

Let’s get creative as we try different materials to create the strongest bridge we can. The beam of a bridge is the part that we walk, drive or move across. It supports a massive amount of weight. It’s important for the beam to be made of sturdy material but be able to move when materials expand or shrink in different weather conditions.

Try your hand at the engineering process to construct your strongest beam possible. Use materials around your house to test out your beams. Things like paper, egg cartons, rulers, blocks, pencils, cardboard can all be used.

First create your 2 supports by placing 2 heavy books or blocks about 10 inches apart to create your gap. All objects will span this gap to create your bridge.

To try out paper place it flat across and begin adding weight. Record your data on a sheet of paper by keeping track of the materials used the amount of weight it was able to hold, just like an engineer!

With each object try making it stronger by folding in half, bending, and fan folding to see if this adds a level of strength to the materials.

What objects were the strongest? What were they made of? Do you think these materials could be used to make bridges to carry cars? What would engineers use to make large bridges?

Share with us you finished bridges! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Encourage Maker Skills

2. Practice Data Collection

3. Understand Strength and Weight of Materials

Materials for this activity: 2 books or heavy objects, coins or paperclips, recycled materials, paper, cardboard, ruler, etc.

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

For more info about bridges!

Famous Bridges from around the World!

Try this fun Bridge Building game!

Standards covered in today’s activities:

Science Standards - S.1B. Technology is any modification to the natural world created to fulfill the wants and needs of humans. The engineering design process involves a series of iterative steps used to solve a problem and often leads to the development of a new or improved technology.

Math Standards:

K.G.1 Describe positions of objects by appropriately using terms, including below, above, beside, between, inside, outside, in front of, or behind.

K.MDA.1 Identify measurable attributes (length, weight) of an object.

K.MDA.2 Compare objects using words such as shorter/longer, shorter/taller, and lighter/heavier.

1.G.2 Combine two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, and trapezoid) or three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cube, rectangular prism, cone, and cylinder) in more than one way to form a composite shape.

4.MDA.2 Solve real-world problems involving distance/length, intervals of time within 12 hours, liquid volume, mass, and money using the four operations.


 

Topic: Motion, Friction, & Building

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration - Engineering: Build Your Own Vehicle

Explore with Simon as we speed along to Vehicle Day! Watch our video below to hear about our zippy activity of the day exploring force and motion. Take a picture and share it with us on Facebook! #TodaysPlay #EdVenture

Definitions

Vehicle: an object used for transporting people or goods, especially on land, such as a car, truck, or train.

Axel: A rod or spindle either fixed or rotating passing through the center of a wheel or group of wheels.

Friction: the force exchanged between 2 surfaces rubbing against each other, like tires on a road.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Understand Engineering Concepts
  • Encourage Maker Skills
  • Practice Using Tools
  • Create Predictions through Observations
  • Follow Directions

Materials needed: cardboard, straw, skewer (or toothpick), 4 bottle caps, tape, scissors, screwdriver, hammer, possible materials to experiment with friction

Add-On: Use the created vehicle from the video as a base to design your own race car. With paper or other found objects in your home, add volume to the body of your vehicle. See how the shape and weight distribution effects the ramp experiment.

Variation: You can also use toy cars to conduct the ramp experiment by running them across several surfaces to see how the friction changes. Also, test your ramp at different levels to see how it effects the results.

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science of Motion

Discover what makes things move. Let’s take a trip around our homes to see what things move! Can you find something easy to move? What about something hard to move? What makes them different?

Collect some different items to try out on your ramp. What happens when you try different sizes and weights of objects? What about different shapes? Can you change the friction on your ramp by changing the surface or height? Consider writing down your findings to compare later.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Explore Physical Forces
  • Explore Properties of Motion
  • Improve Concentration Skills
  • Exercises Their Brain
  • Progress Language Development

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity - Art: Tire Tracks

The invention of the wheel spurred a lot of developments in our world. Today we will use wheels to spark our own growth.

Option 1: Use toy vehicles as stamps. Place a thin amount of paint on a flat surface. Then allow your child to dip the tires of toy cars in paint and roll it across their paper to make tire track art.

Option 2: Flatten out play dough and roll toy cars and trucks on it to make tire tracks. Feel the friction as you work your car through the dough. Examine the tracks differences.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Boost Creativity
  • Invent new purposes for objects
  • Develop Fine Motor Skills

Topic: Static Electricity, Electrons, & Friction

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Engineering: Static Electricity

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we explore Static Electricity! Create your own dancing animal!

This activity will help your student to:

  • Comprehend Invisible Forces
  • Understand the Basics of Electricity
  • Conduct Engineering Inquiry
  • Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Static Electricity – the buildup of electrons in one object, which move to another object in ONE jump.

Atom – the smallest part of matter.

Electron – the negative particle in the atom.

Materials for this activity: balloon, tissue paper (or thin paper), scissors, markers, tape

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity

Now that we understand how static electricity works let explore our homes for more examples. Look around your home to see if you can find other ways to conduct static electricity. Check your closet and bathroom for different items to create a static charge.

Share with us what items you found that create a strong static charge! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

  • Observe Scientific Phenomenon
  • Predict and Test Hypotheses
  • Encourage Scientific Exploration

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Science: Leaping Electricity

Try this experiment at home with materials straight from the kitchen! What likes to jump: Salt or Pepper?

This activity will help your student to:

  • Demonstrate Engineering Principles
  • Conduct an Experiment
  • Encourage Scientific Exploration
  • Repurposing everyday objects

To get started blow up your balloon and tie it closed. Pour a few pinches of salt and pepper onto your baking sheet. Mix it together using a spoon to separate it around the sheet. Rub the balloon on a wool sock or your head to create a static charge. Slowly lower the balloon over the baking sheet until you are about 1 inch from touching the bottom. What happens? You should start to see pepper jump from the tray and onto the balloon.

What is happening? When you rub the balloon with your head or wool, negative charges jump to the balloon. The pepper has a positive charge, so when the balloon gets close the pepper is attracted to the negative charge on the balloon and leaps up. Remember OPPOSITES ATTRACT! Salt also has a positive charge, but it is heavier than the pepper, so the pepper is the first to jump. What are some other opposites you can think of? How are they different?

Can you take a video of your experiment and share it with us on social media? #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: balloon, wool sock (or use your hair), salt, pepper, baking sheet

Additional Resources

Additional Resources:

Try this shockingly fun science experiment!

https://www.education.com/download-pdf/science-fair/80802/

Unlock Everyday Mysteries about Electricity

https://www.loc.gov/everyday-mysteries/item/how-does-static-electricity-work/

All Charged Up with National Geographic Experiments!

https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/science/all-charged-up-wiggly-water/


Topic: Engineering Process

Spark Innovation

SPARK Innovation – Engineering: Toilet Paper Challenge

Watch Today’s Play Video with Simon as he tackles the Toilet Paper Challenge! What creative ways can you use everyday objects, like toilet paper rolls, at home? Give it a try! #ToiletPaperChallenge

This activity will help your student to:

1. Problem Solve

2. Develop Engineering Skills

3. Understand the Engineering Process

4. Think Creatively

Definitions:

Engineering – a process of building and creating new things.

Maker – a person who makes, designs, and builds things.

Reuse – finding a new way to use old things instead of throwing them out.

Materials for this activity: toilet paper rolls

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Engineering: Backyard Binoculars

Here’s a simple activity that will help channel your inner explorer! Using two toilet paper rolls (or one paper towel roll cut in half) create a pair of binoculars by placing them side by side and taping them together. Make sure to decorate them using crayons or makers and don’t forget to add a strap using a piece of yarn or string!

Take your finished creation out into your backyard and see what kind of things you can spy. Look for birds, squirrels, trees, cloud shapes, and all sorts of amazing things. For an extra challenge, have one person hide several items around your home or outdoor space (balls, stuffed animals, trucks, etc) and then use your binoculars to see if you can find them!

Materials needed for this activity: toilet paper or paper towel rolls, tape, markers or crayons, string

Make sure to share your finished binoculars with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Develop Maker Skills

2. Create a Project

3. Explore their Surroundings

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Engineering: Maker Madness

Makers are people who create things from everyday objects. Just like you did with your binoculars! Are you up for another challenge? Let’s go! Using everyday objects around your house, especially those that might be destined for the trash, can you create the following: an animal, a vehicle, and a person? Some awesome materials you might use: toilet paper or paper towel rolls, egg cartons, pipe cleaners, rubber bands, paper clips, aluminum foil, newspaper, etc. Put your creativity to the test and turn trash into treasure by becoming a master maker!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Exercise Critical Thinking

2. Develop Engineering Skills

3. Encourage Creativity

4. Use Materials in New Ways

Be sure to share your creations with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: scissors, tape, toilet paper rolls, paper towel rolls, egg carton, milk jugs, pipe cleaners, newspaper, aluminum foil, etc.

Additional Resources


Topic: Force, Lift, & Air Pressure

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science of Flight!

The Force of Lift Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Taylor and Simon as we explore one of the forces of FLIGHT: Lift! We’ll learn how airplanes and rockets fly through the sky. What objects can you use to create lift?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Apply Scientific Principles

2. Explore Properties of Motion

3. Explain Engineering Models

Definitions:

Lift – the force created by the motion of an airplane moving through the air generated by the shape of the wing or the force that acts at a right angle to the direction of motion through the air.

Air Pressure – the weight of the air molecules in a certain area.

Airplane wings have an “airfoil” shape which makes the air move faster over the top of the wing. When air moves faster, it creates a Low Air Pressure system. Because of this the air pressure on top of the wing is lower than on the bottom of the wing. The difference in pressure creates a force on the wing that lifts the wing up into the air. Simply, Lift is generated by the low pressure on top of the wings and the high pressure under the wings.

Materials for this activity: hair dryer, ping pong ball (or other small ball), small tube (paper towel), sheet of paper

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Engineering: Create a Cup Glider

Now that we have seen lift in action let’s make something fly! Create your own flying contraction.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Explore Physical Forces

2. Teach Focus and Patience

3. Encourage Scientific Exploration

To begin take the rubber bands and loop them through each other to create one long rubber band. Pull 1 rubber band around the other and pull one side through the other to connect them. This will give you a long enough strand to wrap around the cups. To create the flying contraption take 2 plastic, styrofoam, or any non-breakable cup and place the closed ends together. Then take the tape and wrap it around the middle where the cups meet. This should create a V shape with the open ends of the cup facing outward.

Now you are ready to get started! Tightly wrap the rubber band over the middle section where the two cups connect. Extend the end of the rubber band with your thumb 4-5 inches away and under the cups. This will be our Thrust force. Use the other hand to hold the cups horizontally. Pull on the rubber band and let go of the cups (like a sling-shot). If done correctly the cups should spin and hover nicely through the air. Most likely you have accomplished to 1) hit your thumb with the cups or 2) drop the cups on the floor...no gliding, bummer! Or the worst 3) break the rubber band! Don’t despair...you will get the “hang” of it. Check out the video in the Additional Resources section if you want to watch an example of the cup glider.

Materials for this activity: 4-5 rubber bands, 2 cups (same size), tape

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Jump inside the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum!

Women in Aviation experiment

For more information about Flight, Check out Nasa

Cup glider example

Standards covered in today’s activities:

Science Standard 2.P.4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of pushes, pulls, and friction of the motion of objects.

Science Standard 5.P.5: the student will demonstrate an understanding of the factors that affect the motion of an object.


Topic: Float, Sink, & Buoyancy

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Engineering: Float Your Boat

Watch Today’s Play Video with Ms. Taylor and Simon as he learns how to build a boat using materials from around the house. See how many different types of boats you can create?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn Engineering Skills

2. Compare Scientific Concepts

3. Test Designs

Definitions:

Engineering – a process of building and creating new things.

Float – to rest on the surface of a liquid. To be buoyant.

Sink – to fall or drop in a liquid.

Buoyancy - how well something floats

Materials for this activity: aluminum foil, pool noodle, straw, cardstock/foam, cardboard, tape

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Engineering: Natural Science

This experiment is a fun exploration of “sink” and “float”. Fill a shallow container with water. A plastic shoebox works well. If possible, collect different items from outside (sticks, flowers, rocks) or things around the house will also work (paperclips, rubber bands, toothpicks). Try to select as many different objects as you can. Next, make a list of all the items and hypothesize, or guess, if each item will sink or float. Then, give it a try! Place each item in the water and watch what happens. Record your results on your paper. How close were you? What do the items that float have in common? What about the ones that sank? Feel free to experiment with different items and predict the results!

Materials for this activity: plastic container, water, paper, pencil, various items

Make sure to share your results with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Analyze Scientific Data

2. Hypothesize Results

3. Observe Scientific Findings

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Engineering: Density Sink

In this activity we will explore density. Density is the amount of matter an object has compared to its volume. You may have tried to mix oil and water together. Do you remember what happened? The oil sank to the bottom because it is MORE dense than the water. Let’s do an experiment that explores the concept of density. Take two glass, clear works best, fill one about ¾ full with water and the other ¾ full with oobleck. Oobleck is a non-Newtonian fluid that responds to pressure (being squeezed) by becoming thicker and less pressure by becoming thinner. It has a greater density than water. Gather a handful of items. First drop an item in the water. Use a stopwatch or count how long it takes the item to hit the bottom of the glass. Repeat the same experiment with the Oobleck. Note the difference. Which items fell the quickest? Which ones fell more slowly. Compare and contrast these items.

Recipe for Oobleck

- 1 cup cornstarch

- ½ cup water

This activity will help your student to:

1. Create a Non-Newtonian Fluid

2. Explore Density

3. Practice the Scientific Method

Materials for this activity: bowl, cornstarch, water, various objects, stopwatch (optional)

Make sure to share your projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Quicksand Experiment

Easy Science for Kids

Float a Boat

Standards covered for these activities:

Science standards

Kindergarten:

K.P.4A.1 – Analyze and interpret data to compare the qualitative properties of objects (size, shape.. weight,… ability to sink or float) and classify objects based on similar properties.

K.P.4A.3 – Conduct structured investigations to answer questions about which materials have the properties that are best suited to solve a problem or need.

Overall Science and Engineering standard:

S.1B.1 – Construct devices or design solutions to solve specific problems or needs: 1) ask questions to identify problems or needs, 2) ask questions about the criteria and constraints for the devices or solutions, 3) generate and communicate ideas for possible devices or solutions, 4) build and test devices or solutions, 5) determine if the devices or solution solved the problem, and 6) communicate the results.


Topic: Drag, Weight, & Gravity

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Engineering: Flight Day! Drag and Weight

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Taylor and Simon as we explore the forces of FLIGHT: Drag and Weight! Let’s learn about the forces acting on airplanes and slowing us down. Be sure to share your parachute creations with us! #EdVenture #Today’s Play

This activity will help your student to:

1. Apply Scientific Principles

2. Explore Properties of Motion

3. Explain Engineering Models

Definitions:

Drag/Air Resistance – a force that is caused by air, which acts in the opposite direction to an object moving through the air. When air particles hit the front of the object slowing it down, so the more surface area, the more air particles hit the object, and the greater the air resistance.

Mass – the amount of matter an object contains.

Gravity – the force of attraction that pulls objects at, or near, the Earth’s surface towards it. Earth is a massive object with a strong gravitational pull. The larger (more mass) an object has the more it pulls objects towards its surface.

Weight – the measure of the force of gravity on an object. The mass of an object (how much stuff it has) doesn’t change but the weight does depending on how strong the gravity is. In space you would weigh nothing because there isn’t any gravity pulling you down. However, you would have the exact same mass.

Materials for this activity: 2 sheets of paper, tape, scissors, string, hole punch, other materials to act as a parachute like: coffee filter, bag, paper cup, tissue paper, etc

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Parachute Games

We’ve experimented with parachutes and seen them in action, now let’s see if we can create a huge parachute! Grab your family and work together to create drag with a parachute the whole family can fit under.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Explore Physical Forces

2. Teach Teamwork and Cooperation

3. Encourage Scientific Exploration

For this activity you will need at least 2 people. Grab a big bed sheet and spread it out in an open, large space. Each person should spread out equally around the edges. Once in place, everyone will grab the edges of the sheet with their arms spread far apart. Now that everyone is holding tightly to the edge of the sheet, on the count of 3, lift the sheet quickly, as high as you can! Can you feel the air resistance? What happens when the sheet begins to come back down?

Now take it to the next level! Count to 3 again, but this time when you lift the sheet up, duck underneath and sit on the edge. If you close all the edges of the sheet off what happens? Does the air stay inside? How long can you make the giant parachute stay in the air?

Try out different ways of moving with your giant parachute in order to create drag!

Materials for this activity: bed sheet


Spark Innovation

SPARK Innovation – Maker: Paper Airplanes

Did you know that weight is a big deal when it comes to planes flying in the right direction? Have you ever thrown a paper airplane just to have it dive to the ground, or shoot straight up? The reason for this is the distribution of weight around the plane. In this activity you can experiment with different airplane models to see how changing the amount and placement of weight effects your airplanes flight path.

Grab some paper and practice making some of these epic designs: https://howthingsfly.si.edu/activities/paper-airpl...

Once you have created your planes it’s time to experiment with weight! Take some paperclips and put 1 on the front of your plane. Now aim, and fire! What happens to your plane? Did it shoot straight down? Up? Loop-de-loop? Try your paperclip in a different position to see what happens when the weight is distributed onto different parts of the plane. What is the most effective location for flying the plane straight at a target?

Share with us your favorite designs! #EdVenture #Today’s Play

This activity will help your student to:

1. Encourage Innovation and Invention

2. Practice Fine-Motor Skills

3. Experiment with Gravity and Weight

Materials for this activity: Paper, scissors, paper clips


Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

All About Drag – NASA

How Planes Fly

What A Drag – Activity

Standards covered in today’s activities:

Science Standard K.P.4A.1: Analyze and interpret data to compare the qualitative properties of objects (weight) and classify objects based on similar properties.

Science Standard 2.P.4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of pushes, pulls, and friction of the motion of objects. Pushes and pulls can vary in strength and direction and can affect the motion of an object. Gravity is a pull that makes objects fall to the ground.

Science Standard 5.P.5: the student will demonstrate an understanding of the factors that affect the motion of an object.


Topic: Structures & Architecture

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Engineering: Design It, Build It!

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Simon as we become Architects and use our design skills to build our own buildings!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Practice Engineering Principles

2. Demonstrate Understanding of 2D and 3D shapes

3. Explain Engineering Models

Definitions:

Length – the longest side of an object

Width – the shortest side of an object

Height – how tall an object is, the 3rd dimension.

Architect – a person who designs building and other structures

Structure – something with many parts that are put together, like a building, school, home

Build a skyscraper as tall as you can! Can you make yours even taller than Simon’s! Skyscrapers are extremely tall buildings that look like they are scraping the sky! They must have a very strong structure inside to support them. What could you use around your house to make a strong support structure for your building? Test out how strong your building is by placing a heavy object on top and watch to see if it sways of falls! Don’t worry if it falls down the first time, try again! Your designs will get stronger in no time.

Materials for this activity: blocks, legos, popsicle sticks, other building materials, heavy object

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Engineering: Be an Architect

An Architect is an engineer that designs structures! Let’s test your skills to see if you can create your own designs. Use the Design sheet below to create your own Dream Home.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Identify Measurable Attributes of Everyday Objects

2. Understand Spatial Awareness

3. Solve Real-world Math Problems

To create your own design, use the design template. Practice measuring different objects around your house to get a sense of the size of different things. When you are designing you need to make sure that all of your objects will fit inside of your space! Try measuring a bed, table, chair, window, etc. Once you know your measurements it’s time to design! Take your pencil and your ruler and begin drawing the outlines of your rooms for your house. What rooms would you like to have? A kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, movie room! Remember this is your dream home so let your imagination go! Now that you have the walls of your rooms, use the architect’s icons at the top of your worksheet to add different features to your room. If there isn’t one for an object you need feel free to create your own!

Share with us how your Dream House turned out! We can’t wait to see. #Edventure #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: design template, pencil, markers, measuring tool

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Exploration – Maker: Recycle City

Let’s get our imagination going! If you could create your own city what would it be called? It can be a frozen town, sports town, water park town, you name it! What would be important to have in your town? Use your recycled resources to create your own city by taking cardboard, milk jugs, and other materials to design and build to the following specifications. Make sure you have each of the following in your cityscape:

1. Create a Name for your City

2. Build 3 houses

3. Build 1 school

4. Build one recreation/fun area (pool, playground, park)

5. Build 1 skyscraper

6. Create 1 body of water

This activity will help your student to:

1. Encourage Maker Skills

2. Practice Following Directions

3. Explore Your Imagination

Materials for this activity: recycled materials, paper, tape, markers

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Lego Building Challenge! What can you create?

Test our different shapes and materials to learn what makes for the strongest of buildings!

Standards covered in today’s activities:

Science Standards - S.1B. Technology is any modification to the natural world created to fulfill the wants and needs of humans. The engineering design process involves a series of iterative steps used to solve a problem and often leads to the development of a new or improved technology.

Math Standards:

K.G.1 Describe positions of objects by appropriately using terms, including below, above, beside, between, inside, outside, in front of, or behind.

K.G.5 Draw two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, and circle) and create models of three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere).

K.MDA.1 Identify measurable attributes (length, weight) of an object.

K.MDA.2 Compare objects using words such as shorter/longer, shorter/taller, and lighter/heavier.

1.G.2 Combine two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, and trapezoid) or three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cube, rectangular prism, cone, and cylinder) in more than one way to form a composite shape.

2.G.2 Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares to form an array and count to find the total number of parts.

3.G.4 Identify a three-dimensional shape (i.e., right rectangular prism, right triangular prism, pyramid) based on a given two-dimensional net and explain the relationship between the shape and the net.

3.MDA.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.

4.MDA.2 Solve real-world problems involving distance/length, intervals of time within 12 hours, liquid volume, mass, and money using the four operations.

5.MDA.4 Differentiate among perimeter, area and volume and identify which application is appropriate for a given situation.


Topic: Lasers & Problem Solving

Spark Innovation

SPARK Innovation – Engineering: Spy Day – Laser Maze

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Secret Agents Taylor and Simon as they venture into the world of spies! Join us as we sneak through this adventurous Laser Spy Maze. Using string and tape our secret agents design their own String Laser Maze and test their spy skills to see if they can make it through the dangerous maze!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Practice Design Skills Using Geometry

2. Develop Gross Motor Skills

3. Develop Problem Solving Skills

Definitions:

Reflection – when a beam/wave of light bounces off a reflective surface, like a mirror

Materials for this activity: yarn/string, tape, scissors, a hallway

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – False Fingerprints

Every good spy is a pro at copying fingerprints. This helps them get into all sorts of top-secret locations. Have you ever heard that every fingerprint is different? That is why fingerprints are used to identify someone. After copying your fingerprint, try copying someone else’s to compare. What is different about your fingerprints? Are there more swirls? Squiggles? Arches? See if you can decipher the difference between each set of fingerprints.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Follow Directions

2. Develop Keen Observation Skills

3. Encourage Investigation

Follow these steps to create your own fingerprint copy.

1. Take a piece of paper and then rub the pencil in a small square to fill it in completely.

2. Rub your finger a few times over top of the square to get the color onto your finger.

3. Take a small piece of tape and roll your “inked” fingerprint onto the sticky side of the tape.

4. Choose what surface you want to place your fingerprint on. Take the tape and smooth it out onto your surface (like a piece of paper or a door knob). Press down to make sure the print transfers to the object.

5. Life the tape off to reveal the fingerprint! Viola you have your very own fingerprint copy to use over and over again.

Materials for this activity: clear tape, paper, pencil

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Maker: Spy Disguise

Being a spy means using your disguises to turn yourself into all sorts of different people. Can you use your imagination to create your own disguise? Use the templates below or use resources from around your home to disguise yourself so no one will recognize you! Print out the template, color and cut your disguise out to begin your character. Can you come up with a name and an accent for your secret identity. See if you can fool someone in your house with your new secret identity! Show us your spy wear and your best disguise! #EdVenture #Today’s Play

Grab some paper and practice making some of these epic designs.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Encourage Imaginative Play

2. Create and Design Characters

3. Inspire Creativity

Materials for this activity: Paper, handout (download here), scissors, markers, crayons, other materials around your home


Topic: Forces, Thrust, & Laws of Motion

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Science: Rockets Lift Off! The Force of Thrust

On May the 4th speed into space with Ms. Taylor and Simon in Today’s Play Video as we explore one of the forces of FLIGHT: Thrust! We’ll learn how rockets fly through the sky using a very strong force!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Apply Scientific Principles

2. Explore Properties of Motion

3. Explain Engineering Models

Definitions:

Force – a push or a pull

Thrust – the force that moves an object (like a rocket or airplane) forward. In airplanes this force is created by the engine or propeller.

Newton’s Third Law of Motion – for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction

Materials for this activity: balloon, scooter, push rocket, a family member

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Maker: Straw Rocket

Blast off! Let’s use the power of our breath to make our rockets shoot to the stars.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Encourage Maker Skills

2. Practice Following Directions

3. Experiment with Aeronautic Forces

Use the template below to create your very own straw rocket to blast off! Try your rocket with different amounts of breath also try shooting the rocket into different direction to see how this affects the flight of your rocket.

MAKE YOUR OWN STRAW ROCKET

Materials for this activity: Template sheet (above), sharp pencil, scissors, tape, straw

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Engineering: Balloon Space Rover

Thrust is important in making many different vehicles move. Even things like space rovers and space ships need thrust to get them moving in the right direction. Let’s use the knowledge we learned from our Rocket Day video to create our own Space Rover. When in Space you only have what is available around you so your challenge today is to use anything at your disposal to create a vehicle that will move without you pushing it. Below is an example of how we made our Space Rover. But all ideas worth trying and will depend on what resources you have available. Make sure to have an adult help with this project and always ask permission before using scissors.

Share your brilliant ideas for your Super Space Rovers with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Explore Physical Forces

2. Teach Focus and Patience

3. Encourage Inventing Process

Check out the steps below to get going on designing your own Space Rover:

Step 1. Pull your materials together to see how you can construct your Rover. We used cardboard, a balloon, reusable straw, rubber band, skewers, pencil, fruit container, paper, and tape to create ours but there are many other materials you could use.

Step 2. Cut out a rectangle from your cardboard (about 2-3 in wide and 6-7 in long) and decide on your wheel size. We chose large wheels and used a peanut butter lid to trace 4 circles onto our cardboard. Once traced use scissors to carefully cut them out.

Step 3. Create the axels for your rover by cutting 2 strips of paper that are as wide as your cardboard rectangle and about 3-4 in long. Roll each strip into a tube about the size of your pinky and tape each closed. Then attach the 2 axels on the underside of your rectangular cardboard body so that they are parallel about 1-2 inches from the end of the body.

Step 4. To create your thrust mechanism we used a balloon, rubber band and reusable straw. Place the balloon on one end of your straw and securely attach it with a rubber band or tape.

Step 5. Create a hole for the wheel to attach by using a pencil or a skewer end to gently poke a hole in the center of the cardboard wheels. Make sure the hole is in the same spot on all 4 wheels. Slide the skewer through the rolled paper axels BEFORE sliding the wheels onto each skewer end.

Step 6. Now you should have a moveable vehicle. Test it out by applying thrust and pushing your car forward to test if it rolls well. Engineers always test out their designs to ensure that they have everything working properly before they create their finished product. Go back to the drawing board if you need to recreate or refasten a part of your car.

Step 7. Place your container on top of your cardboard base using tape. This serves as your body and you where you can place science equipment for the many space missions to come.

Step 8. To attach a thrust mechanism, we placed the straw through the top of our container using 2 of the slits so air could still go through. Make sure to have part of the open end of the straw sticking out so that you can blow up the balloon.

Step 9. Test it out! Try blowing up your balloon and pinching the end of your straw between your fingers so the air doesn’t escape. Place your rover on the ground and then release!

We hope your rover rolls across the ground and off to its missions. If part of your rover doesn’t work quite right the first time don’t give up, try again! That’s part of being an Engineer. Try and try again till you create the best Space Rover you can!

Take a look at our completed Space Rover below:

Space Rover.jpg

Materials for this activity: cardboard, bottle tops, balloon, straw (reusable), container, skewer or pencil, rubberband, paper, tape, scissors.

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Be a Rocket Engineer with this fun rocket building game!

Find out more about rockets!

For more information about Flight Check out Nasa.

Standards covered in today’s activities:

Science Standard 2.P.4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of pushes, pulls, and friction of the motion of objects.

Science Standard 5.P.5: the student will demonstrate an understanding of the factors that affect the motion of an object.


Arts

 

Topic: Mermaids & Literacy

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Literacy: “Simon the Sea Monkey”

Watch Today’s Play Video with Simon and Mermaid Myrine as we listen to a story about the magic of the ocean and the adventures that await us there! Today we are focusing on adjectives, or words that are used to describe nouns or pronouns. Ex: RED ball, BIG dog, BUMPY road. Mermaid Myrine uses lots of adjectives in her story. How many can you identify?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn the Elements of Storytelling

2. Explore Adjectives

3. Develop Emotional Literacy

4. Think Creatively

Definitions:

Story – a description of people, places, and events.

Plot – the series of events in a story.

Characters – the people (or animals) the story revolves around.

Adjectives - words used to describe nouns or pronouns (color, shape, size, etc)

Materials for this activity: your imagination and listening ears

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Literacy: Awesome Adjectives

Let’s go on an awesome adjective adventure! Good writers know that descriptions of people, places, and things (nouns) are what gives a story life. They turn the ordinary into the extraordinary by letting your reader use their imaginations to picture new worlds. How good are you at describing things? Let’s find out!

Take a notebook and a pencil and go on a hunt around your home or backyard. Find three completely different objects. These can be anything, toys, food, plants… even animals! Once you have your three items selected it’s time to put those adjectives to work. How many different words can you use to describe each object? Can you come up with at least five for each? Consider the objects size, color, weight, texture, etc. This might help you when you’re describing. Bonus points if you can come up with a short story to include all the items in! Good luck!

Materials for this activity: paper and pencil

Make sure to share your finished stories with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recognize Adjectives

2. Use their Imaginations

3. Create a Story

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Literacy: Adjective I-Spy

Grab your favorite book. A shorter one might work better for this activity. See how many adjectives you can recognize within the story. Remember, adjectives are the words describing the nouns (people, places, and things) and the pronouns (I, You, He, She, It, They) in the story. They will be the fun and colorful words that give the story its sparkle. Does your favorite book use a lot of them? What are some examples? If you were telling this story would you choose the same ones that the author did? Or would you use different ones?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recognize Adjectives

2. Explore Literature

3. Collect Data

4. Understand Literature

Make sure to share your fantastic finds with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: a book, paper and pencil


 

Topic: Stained Glass Art

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Art: Stained Glass

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn how to create our very own stained-glass creations at home! Get ready to get colorful and crafty with Simon!

Materials needed for this activity: wax paper, permanent markers, ruler

This activity will help your student to:

1. Practice Fine Motor Skills

2. Design a Project

3. Create Interesting Patterns

4. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Stained-Glass – glass colored by metallic salts. Often cut into pieces and assembled to create designs and pictures held together by lead strips in a sturdy frame.

Pattern – a repeated design or sequence.

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Art: Tissue Paper Stained-Glass

If you want another cool “stained-glass” activity try swapping the markers for tissue paper! With just a little glue you can design and create a piece of art that glows in the sun! Select as many different colors of tissue paper as you would like. Use your scissors (with your parent’s permission) to cut the paper into a variety of 2D shapes like triangles, squares, hexagons, etc. Now it’s time to plan your design. Lay the shapes onto your wax paper until you’ve created the design you like. It can be a specific picture or just a beautiful collection of colors. Once you’ve settled on your design, begin gluing your pieces into place. Thin layer of glue work best. Allow your project to dry overnight. Once it’s dry you can hang it in a window and watch it glow!

Materials needed for this activity: wax paper, tissue paper, scissors, rubber cement or white glue (diluted to 3 parts glue/1 part water) & paint or sponge brush

Make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Plan and Design

2. Recognize 2D Shapes

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Painted Stain-Glass

This is a wonderful tactile activity that allows you to turn any window in a beautiful piece of art! Use masking tape to create an outline on your window. Next, continue to use the tape to divide your outline into different sections. You can create an image or just section it into different shapes. Once you’ve filled in your outline it’s time to make your paint! Take a plastic container and place a small amount of paint into it (about a tsp), add 2-3 drops of dish soap, and a few drops of water. Mix. Now you have your

very own washable paint! Create as many different colors as you like! Fill in your design. It may take 2-3 coats to ensure the most vibrant colors. When your design is dry you can remove the tape. Make sure to go outside and look at your beautiful new window. When you’re ready to remove it, just use a wet rag to wipe the paint off. Have fun and make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Design a Project

2. Practice Fine Motor Skills

3. Mix Ingredients

4. Encourage Creativity

Materials for this activity: masking tape, tempera paint, dish soap, paint brush, containers for paint


 

Topic: Pirates

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Literacy: Pirate Map Skills

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn how to read a map and go on an adventure for hidden treasure!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn Compass Directions

2. Understand Prepositions

3. Read a Map

4. Inspire Curiosity

Definitions:

Compass – is a tool used for finding direction. It has a magnetic needle, which spins freely, and always points North. It shows all directions in relation to North (South, East, West).

Prepositions – words that link nouns or pronouns to other words in a sentence. They are often used to describe the position of something (by, through, under, etc.).

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Literacy: Treasure Map

Let’s go on an adventure by creating our very own treasure map! Using your house and/or backyard (with your parent’s permission) find a place you’d like to hide your chosen treasure. This could be a favorite toy or some other special item. Now, starting from your bedroom, create a map showing where the item is located. Include as much detail as possible and remember your directions (North, South, East, West) when drawing your map. Make sure your map is easy to follow and understand. When you’re complete, give it to a family member and see if they can use it to find your hidden treasure. You’re off to becoming a great explorer with your new map skills!

Make sure to share your completed treasure maps with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Click here for a Treasure Map template!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Design a Project

2. Read a Map

3. Observe Object Relations

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Literacy: Blindfolded Map Adventure

Today we’re going to explore the world without having to leave our homes! Grab a map of the world, or a globe if you have it, close your eyes and have someone spin you around or spin the globe. When you/it stops, place your finger on the map. Open your eyes and remove the blindfold. Where are you traveling to today? What continent? Have your parent or adult help you research that area of the world. What does their flag look like? What kinds of foods do they like to eat? Do they have any special holidays or

traditions? See how much you can learn about the people who live there and, who knows, maybe one day you’ll get to visit! Have fun and happy travels!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn Geography

2. Practice Social Studies

3. Encourage Inquiry

Make sure to share your adventures with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: map or globe

Additional Resources


 

Topic: String Art

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Art: String Prints

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn how to create our very own abstract string art prints using simple everyday items!

Materials needed for this activity: paper, string, paint

This activity will help your student to:

1. Practice Fine Motor Skills

2. Observe Mirror Images

3. Create Interesting Patterns

4. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Print – an impression made on a surface (paper) using another object (string) and paint/ink.

Pattern – a repeated design or sequence.

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Art: Stitched String Art

Empty, or negative, space can be beautiful! In this activity you will use string to “color in” areas of negative space. All you’ll need is a small paper plate or cardstock, some string, a hole punch, and some scissors. Draw a simple shape on the plate. Hearts, stars, trees, and circles all work well. Have an adult help you cut out the shape using scissors. Now you will have a hole in the shape of that image on your plate. Next, use your hole punch to punch holes around the outside of the shape. Try to place them closely to the outside of the shape without punching through the walls. Finally, thread your string through the holes “filling in” the shape. Try zig-zagging the string from one hole to the next. Is it possible to create a pattern inside of the shape? Leave a tail at the beginning and at the end of the project. Knot them together when you are finished. Well done! What other shapes can you create?

Materials needed for this activity: small paper plate or cardstock, hole punch, scissors, string, pencil

Make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Design a Project

2. Create Patterns

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Wall Hanging

This is a simple art project with lots of room for creativity! All you’ll need is some string or yarn in different colors and a stick or dowel to attach them to! Begin by deciding how long you want your piece to be when it hangs on your wall. Cut a piece of string twice as long as the desired length. Tie it to the center of your stick. Now, cut pieces to hang on either side of the center piece. Maybe you want to keep them all the same length and alternate colors, creating a pattern. Or, perhaps the strings will get shorter the closer they come to the end of the stick, creating a triangle. After you’ve filled up your stick you may want to braid sections together. Let your imagination the guide! When complete tie a piece of string from one end of the stick to the other so you can hang it. If you have beads laying around those might be a great addition! Have fun and happy crafting!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Design a Project

2. Practice Fine Motor Skills

3. Create a Pattern

4. Encourage Creativity

Make sure to share your wall hangings with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: wooden dowel or stick, string or yarn, scissors

Additional Resources


 

Topic: Watercolor Resist Art

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity – Art: Watercolor Resist

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we create a watercolor resist! Follow along and learn how to make your own!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn Watercolor Techniques

2. Explore Wax Resists

3. Design an Art Project

4. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Watercolor – a type of paint that is mixed with water to create colors on paper.

Resist – to push away or prevent something.

Design – an arrangement of different parts in a work of art.

Materials for this activity: paper (watercolor or cardstock works best), white crayon or oil pastel, watercolor paints (or watered-down tempera or food coloring diluted in water), paint brush

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Art: Watercolor Rubbings

Now that you’ve gotten the hang of using watercolors and creating resists let’s put those skills to work!

A rubbing is a design created by placing a piece of paper over an object and using a crayon to “rub” over the paper to reveal the texture. Use your white crayon to create a rubbing of an object. A coin, a leaf, or a paper doily all work well. After you’ve finished your rubbing use your watercolor paints to revel your design! How many different types of designs can you create?

Make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Identify Objects with Texture

2. Create Patterns

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Inspire Creativity

Materials for this activity: paper, white crayon or oil pastel, watercolor paints (or watered-down tempera or food coloring diluted in water), paint brush, texture objects


Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Watercolor Recall

Take a walk outside. Look at all the beautiful things that surround you. Pick something to focus on. Perhaps a tree, a passing cloud, or some flowers. Study them closely. Notice their size, shape, color, etc. After you’ve studied them for a few minutes go back inside. Now, with your paints, can you recall what the object looked like? Paint it from memory. Close your eyes and see if you can remember details about it. When your painting is dry take it outside and compare it, if possible, to the original. How close did you come? Don’t be scared to be artistic, have fun!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recall Objects from Memory

2. Practice Life Drawing

3. Encourage Creativity

Make sure to share your wonderful watercolors with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: paper, paint, paint brushes

Additional Resources

Additional Resources:

Try your hand at Watercolor Rainbows

https://kinderart.com/art-lessons/painting/watercolor-rainbows/

Dive into the Art of Texture with the National Gallery of Art

https://www.nga.gov/education/teachers/lessons-activities/elements-of-art/texture.html

Color with Patterns

http://scrapcoloring.com/


Topic: Sculpture & Pottery

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Art: Salt Dough Sculpture

Watch Today’s Play Video with Simon as he learns how to build simple pottery using salt dough! Create your own salt dough at home to see what you can create!

This activity will help your student to:

  • Learn Basic Pottery
  • Explore 3D Objects
  • Design an Art Project
  • Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Sculpture – 3D art made from clay, wood, metal, or stone.

Pottery – bowls, plates, vases, etc, made mostly from clay.

Clay – a natural material made mostly from rock that is mixed with water to create pottery or sculpture.

Materials for this activity: playdoh or salt dough

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Art: DIY Salt Dough

Playdoh is a popular sculpting clay but, did you know, that it’s easy to create your own salt dough at home? Follow the simple recipe below to make your own sculpting dough. All you need are a few simple ingredients and, it’s a lot of fun to make! Blend a few different colors and see what kind of creations you can build. Roll it out and use cookie cutters to make shapes. Press different objects into it to make impression and give it texture. Or sculpt it into people or animals. Your imagination is the limit so get to mixing and make a masterpiece!

Salt Dough Recipe

- 1 cup salt

- 1 cup flour

- ½ cup water

- 3-4 drops of food coloring

Mix ingredients together in a bowl. If it is too runny, add more flour. If it is too tough, add more water.

Make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

  • Measure Ingredients
  • Create a New Material
  • Practice Fine Motor Skills
  • Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Sculpture I-Spy

Art museums are wonderful places filled with art from around the world. They show us art from the past as well as modern art. They are magical collections of human creativity. Since some art museums are very far away, today we will be going on a virtual tour. In the links below you will find tours to some of the best art museums in the entire world. Pick the one and let’s play a game of I-Spy! In all of these tours you will see various types of sculpture.

Can you spot each of the following? (Hint: You might have to go on more than one tour to find them all.)

1. A sculpture with more than one person

2. A sculpture with an animal in it

3. A sculpture with a body but no head

4. A sculpture with a sword

5. Bonus points if you can recreate one of these sculptures using your salt dough and post online! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Art Museum Virtual Tours:

Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

The British Museum

National Gallery, London

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recognize Sculpture

2. Pay Attention to Detail

3. Recreate Shapes

Make sure to share your super sculptures with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: salt dough

Additional Resources


Topic: Literacy & Onomatopoeia

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity – Literacy: What Makes a Hero

Join Ms. Kendal and Simon on Superhero Day! Let’s learn about what being a superhero is all about and how you can be one too!

Can you create your very own Superhero Symbol that tells the world about your mission as a superhero? Here’s some tips to help you create your own insignia.

1. What type of hero do you want to be?

2. Think about colors you are dawn to.

3. Come up with pictures that represent your hero.

Definitions:

Onomatopoeia – the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named. Ex: POW or BOOM

This activity will help your student to:

• Understand Literary Devices

• Define Positive Characteristics

• Develop Emotional Literacy

• Create a Caring Community

Find your Superhero Symbol Template here.

Materials for this activity: your imagination, paper handout, pencil


Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Literacy: Creating a Superhero

Now that you know the qualities of a superhero and your insignia, it’s time to design your very own superhero! Use the template below and think about what traits you want your hero to have. Write down and check the boxes for their traits and costume. Once you have thought about all your pieces, use the next page to bring it all together with a picture of your superhero who’s ready to save the day!

Make sure to share your finished superheroes with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Find your Superhero Template here.

Materials for this activity: paper handout, pencil, markers or crayons

This activity will help your student to:

• Use their Imaginations

• Inspire Creativity

• Model Character Development

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Helping Hands

How to be an At-Home Superhero: Simon talked about 5 character traits that all superheroes possess. Here are some simple things you can do everyday to be like our superheroes and help save the day.

1. Brave: Superheroes are known for their acts of bravery. But bravery doesn't have to be leaping off tall buildings, it can be sharing difficult feelings with others or standing up for what you know is right. How can you be brave?

2. Kind: Kindness is a virtue of any noble superhero. Try doing or saying something kind to the people around you. Help with chores or give a compliment. For every smile you receive your powers will grow!

3. Honest: Real superheroes know that telling the truth always saves the day! Villains tend to lie to get what they want. True heroes know that honesty helps you soar!

4. Wise: In order to solve a problem, superheroes have to learn about what they're facing. Studying a variety of subjects keeps your brain super strong and ready to fight the injustice of ignorance!

5. Helpful: Perhaps the most important quality of a superhero is their helpful spirit. Heroes help those in need, starting with their families at home. Helping out around the house, like cleaning, doing chores, and playing well with your siblings, increases your superpowers. How else can you be a helpful hero in your own home?


Topic: Creating Collages

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity – Art: Collage

Watch Today’s Play Video with Simon and Ms. Kendal as we learn how to create a beautiful collage by reusing materials you might have around your home. Gather your supplies and let’s create together!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn the Art of Collage

2. Recognize Patterns

3. Design an Art Project

4. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Collage – a work of art made by gluing different materials to a surface.

Pattern – an arrangement of things (shapes, colors, etc.) that repeat.

Composition – the way in which things are put together.

Materials for this activity: paper, magazines or old magazines, scissors, glue stick

Spark Innovation

SPARK Innovation – Art: Recycled Rainbow

We don’t have to wait for a rainy day to see a rainbow, we can make our very own rainbow indoors! Take a piece of cardboard, or heavy paper, and cut it into the shape of a rainbow (A thick “u” shape.). Make sure to ask for help from an adult when using scissors. Once you have your rainbow base, now comes the fun part… decorating! Gather supplies from around your house in all the different colors of the rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple. These items can be anything - bottle caps, pipe cleaners, tissue paper, small toys, beads, plastic flowers, etc. Bonus points if you use things that would otherwise go in the trash! Use white glue to stick your items to your rainbow. Make sure to stay in rainbow color order! All red items together, followed by orange, yellow, etc. When you’ve finished adding all your items, let your project dry overnight. You can add some ribbon to the back and hang it up. That way you’ll be able to see a rainbow every day!

Materials for this activity: cardboard or heavy paper, scissors, white glue, various small objects

Make sure to share your Recycled Rainbow with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Identify Colors

2. Design a Project

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Inspire Creativity


Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Monochrome Collage

The word monochrome means “one color”. Today you will create a collage using only items from the same color family (Ex: all red, all blue, all yellow). Grab a piece of paper, construction paper in your favorite colors works well, and some glue. Then search for pictures or items of that color to add to your collage. What things do you notice about your collection? Do certain images or types of objects keep appearing? How does your color choice “feel”? Red is said to be exciting while blue has more of a calming effect. Colors make us feel certain ways, which is why we are drawn to some more than others. Monochrome isn’t boring, so have fun and be creative! We can’t wait to see what you create!

Materials for this activity: paper (white or construction), glue, scissors, images or small items

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recognize Monochrome

2. Practice Color Grouping

3. Design a Project

4. Inspire Creativity

Make sure to share your magnificent monochromes with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay


Topic: Parts of a Story

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Literacy: Storytelling

Watch Today’s Play Video with Ms. Kendal and Simon as we tell a story and travel into our imagination. Stories take us to new places and help us explore different emotions. What kind of stories can you create and tell at home? Spend time letting your student develop their own story. Guide them using the definitions listed below.

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn the Elements of Storytelling

2. Create a Narrative

3. Develop Emotional Literacy

4. Think Creatively

Definitions:

Story – a description of people, places, and events.

Plot – the series of events in a story.

Characters – the people (or animals) the story revolves around.

Materials for this activity: your imagination, paper, pencil

Spark Creativity

SPARK Creativity – Literacy: Creating a Character

Think of all the stories you’ve ever read. In all of them one thing always stands out, the characters. Characters create the action of the story and they move the plot along. Sometimes characters are good. We call these characters protagonists. Sometimes characters are bad. We call those characters antagonists. No matter what sort of story you decide to tell, it will need characters.

Here’s a fun activity to try to get you ready to write your story! Grab some paper and a pen and close your eyes and begin to imagine a character. Is it a girl or a boy? Do they have superpowers? Are they brave? Good at math? Really try to picture it. Now, open your eyes and begin to draw. Don’t worry if you’re not very good at art, this is just for you! Try to capture as much detail as possible. What kind of clothes do they wear? Long hair or short? Do they have wings? Anything you can imagine. This is your character. Finally, make sure to give your character a name.

Now you’re ready to write your story. You’re already off to a great start. Visualizing people and their relationships to one another helps tell an engaging story. Have fun!

Materials for this activity: paper, pencil, markers or crayons

Make sure to share your finished characters with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Develop a Character

2. Use their Imaginations

3. Consider Relationships

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Literacy: Problem Solving Storytime

Alright storytellers, it’s time to write! You’ve already got your most important part… your character! Every story needs conflict, or a problem for your character to solve. This is usually presented halfway through the story. When the character comes up with a solution to the problem that is called the resolution which is how the story ends. Use the prompts below to write a story of your own!

1. Introduce your character. (Name, age, interests)

2. Give your character something to do. (Ex: go to school)

3. Have your character encounter a problem. (bully, villain, etc)

4. How does that problem make your character feel? (Sad, worried, etc)

5. Come up with a solution for your character’s problem. (courage)

6. Wrap up your story. (The End!)

You can find the worksheet here.

Directions: Follow the prompts in each square to create your story. You can use words and/or pictures!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Develop a Story

2. Create Characters

3. Encourage Creativity

4. Understand Plot

Make sure to share your fantastic stories with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: paper and pencil


Additional Resources


Topic: Creating Stamps

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Art: String Stamps

Watch Today’s Play Video with Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn how to make our very own string stamps! What interesting shapes and designs can you create at home?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn Stamp Making

2. Explore Patterns

3. Design an Art Project

4. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Stamp – to make an impression on something using an object dipped in paint or ink.

Pattern – a repeating series of images or shapes.

Texture – how a certain object feels. Ex: rough, smooth, bumpy.

Materials for this activity: cardboard, string or yarn, white glue, scissors

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Art: Nature Stamps

Nature is full of beautiful shapes and patterns. Using the skills you learned from your string stamps, go outside and see what sort of items you can find that would create awesome nature stamps. Look for items that have texture or naturally occurring patterns. Things such as leaves, tree bark, flowers, pinecones, and rocks, would all work well. Dip these items into ink or paint and press them onto your paper. What kind of design did it make? See if you can collect items that are smooth, rough, bumpy, etc, to create your stamps. Which items work the best? Experiment with different textures to find your favorite stamp and, most importantly, have fun!

Materials for this activity: ink or paint, a paintbrush, paper, various bits of nature

Make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recognize Patterns

2. Observe the Natural World

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Toilet Paper Roll Stamps

Finding new uses for old materials is a great way to make art and help the planet! In this activity all you’ll need are some toilet paper rolls, scissors, and paint! Start by dipping your toilet paper roll into the paint and stamping it onto your paper. You just created a gorgeous circle! Now, take your scissors and cut 1-inch strips around the top of your roll and pull them back. Repeat stamping your roll onto paper. What did it look like? A beautiful flower perhaps? A stellar star? See how many different shapes you can make using just one toilet paper roll! What other items around your house could you use to make stamps? Hint, rubber bands stretched across cardboard make amazing patterns!

Materials for this activity: toilet paper rolls, scissors, paint

This activity will help your student to:

1. Repurpose Materials

2. Recognize Shapes

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Craft Creatively

Make sure to share your super stamps with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay


Topic: Paper Folding & Origami

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Art: Origami Day

Watch Today’s Play Video with Ms. Taylor and Simon as we learn Origami, the art of paper folding! We are making some cool animals just out of paper!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn the Art of Origami

2. Explore Patterns

3. Teach Focus and Patience

4. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Origami – the art of folding paper

Pattern – a repeating series of images or shapes.

Hamburger fold – a piece of paper folded where the short-edged corners are pulled together to create a short edge fold.

Hamburger fold – a piece of paper folded where the long-edged corners are pulled together to create a long edge fold.

Taco fold – a piece of paper folded where two opposite corners are pulled together to create a diagonal fold across the paper.

Materials for this activity: paper, scissors, markers, How to make a square paper out of a rectangle sheet

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Art: Folding Patterns

For younger learners let’s practice some of our first folds. When we fold a piece of paper it creates 2 halves. What happens when you fold the paper again? Now it has 4 parts! Fold it again, now it has 8! Each new fold of our paper splits it into more and more parts. Let’s see how many different parts we can create on our paper. Using the hamburger and hotdog folds (long ways and short ways folds) fold your paper once, unfold and count your pieces, then refold along that line. Repeat this step until you can no longer fold it anymore. How many folds did you make? How many pieces was your paper split into? 16? 32? 64!!

Now let's see if we can create our very own repeating patterns within our rectangles. Using markers, stickers, or any other supply you have on hand, come up with a pattern that you can repeat. Like this: red circle, yellow star, green square. Once you have come up with your pattern start at the top corner and see if you can use your pattern to fill in each of your rectangles across and down your whole folded

paper. Try out different folding styles to see if you can create different shapes within the paper. Which fold will give you triangle shapes across the paper?

Materials for this activity: paper, crayons for markers (could also use stamps, stickers, etc)

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recognize Shapes

2. Explore Patterns

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Understanding Parts of a Whole and Fractions

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Springtime Flowers

Who loves flowers in the spring? Let’s create a beautiful springtime scene with these origami tulips.

Follow these steps (which start very similar to the dog from the video) and let inspiration take over to create your own beautiful spring scene.

Materials for this activity: construction paper, glue stick, crayons, square paper

This activity will help your student to:

1. Hone Fine Motor Skills

2. Recognize Shapes

3. Inspire Creativity

Step 1. Take a square piece of paper and create a diagonal fold just like for the dog origami.

Step 2. Fold in half to create the center line, by taking one corner and folding it towards the other just like the second step of the dog origami.

Step 3. Follow the same folds as step 3 in the dog origami but fold the 2 corners close to the middle line. Face the 3 points upward.

Step 4: Flip your paper over. Fold the bottom tip under a tiny bit as well as the 2 sides to create a rounded tulip shape.

Create as many of these tulips as you want to create your springtime scene. Take the tulips and glue them onto a full-sized sheet of construction paper. Make the rest of your scene using crayons, markers, paint, etc. create the stems, leaves, grass, sunshine and other friends you might find in the springtime like butterflies or ladybugs!


Topic: Constellations & Story Creation

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Maker: Constellations

Watch Today’s Play Video with Ms. Kendal and Simon and learn all about constellations and how to make your very own, stellar constellation craft at home!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Recognize Constellations

2. Understand their Stories

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

Definitions:

Constellation – a group of stars that form a pattern such as an animal or a person. Many constellations have stories behind them and how they relate to each other.

Materials for this activity: construction paper (black), ruler, star stickers, metallic pens or pencil, thumbtack, flashlight

Make sure to share your projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Literacy: Create Your Own Constellation

Now that you’ve learned all about the constellations that already exist, it’s time to create your own! Design your own constellation using the method from the video, and write a story about it. Is it a person, an animal, a magical item, or something else entirely? The sky is the limit! We can’t wait to see what sorts of amazing constellations you come up with!

Materials for this activity: construction paper (black), ruler, metallic markers or pencil, star stickers, paper (lined)

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn about Constellations

2. Explore the Elements of a Story

3. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration - Maker: Pipe Cleaner Constellations

Let’s build a 3D constellation using some materials from around the house! Select a picture of your favorite constellation. Notice its shape and where the stars are located inside it. Now, using your pipe cleaners and beads see if you can recreate it. Bend the pipe cleaners to form the outline and the beads for each star. How close did you come? What other constellations can you make? Glow in the dark beads on black pipe cleaners would give an awesome effect at nighttime!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Understand Constellations

2. Build a Sculpture

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

Materials for this activity: pipe cleaners and plastic beads

Make sure to share your projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay


Topic: Art of Decoupage

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Art: Decoupage

Watch Today’s Play Video with Simon and Ms. Kendal as they learn how to decoupage and create beautiful patterns onto some unlikely items! Grab your clue and some paper and let’s give old items a colorful new life!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Learn Decoupage Techniques

2. Practice Fine Motor Skills

3. Design an Art Project

4. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:

Decoupage – a type of art created by gluing colorful paper to an object.

Design – an arrangement of different parts in a work of art.

Materials for this activity: decoupage glue or white glue (3 parts glue/1 part water), wide paint/sponge brush, plate to squeeze glue onto, item(s) to decorate

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination – Art: Rainbow Candle Jar

In this cool craft we’re going to create our very own rainbow jars! All you will need is an empty clear glass jar (pasta sauce, jelly, mason,) and your decoupage materials (glue & brush). Use as many different colors of tissue paper as you would like to turn your jar into an explosion of color! You could create a rainbow stripe pattern (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple) or design your own. Rip up your tissue paper into smaller pieces. Then apply a thin layer of glue to stick it down. When everything is glued down make sure to give it one thin coat of glue all around to seal it. Let your jar dry overnight. Then you can add a battery-operated votive candle inside to watch your rainbow glow! It will make you smile all throughout the night!

Materials for this activity: decoupage glue or white glue (3 parts glue/1 part water), wide paint/sponge brush, plate to squeeze glue onto, various colors of tissue paper, empty clear glass jar

Make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

This activity will help your student to:

1. Identify Objects with Texture

2. Create Patterns

3. Practice Fine Motor Skills

4. Inspire Creativity

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Art: Wish Box

We’ve all made wishes before… on candles, on stars, on wishbones. Now we can create a place to store our wishes! By using an old shoe or cardboard box you can create a safe place for all of the wonderful wishes you’ll make! Design it anyway you’d like. Perhaps add some stars? Or four-leaf clovers? Or anything else you think is lucky. There’s no wrong way to do it so make is as personal as you would like.

When you’re done, let it dry, then you can begin adding your wishes. Maybe they are things you’ve written down or pictures of places you’d like to visit one day. Whatever you wish you can put it in your box. That way, one day, it will come true!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Develop Decoupage Skills

2. Inspire Imagination

3. Encourage Creativity

Make sure to share your wonderful wishes with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Materials for this activity: empty cardboard box, decoupage glue or white glue (3 parts glue/1 part water), tissue paper or magazine/newspaper, scissors if necessary (Make sure to ask a grown up!)

Additional Resources


Topic: Rhyming & Poetry

Spark Imagination

SPARK  Imagination – Literacy: Rhyming Poetry

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn how to create our very own rhyming poem just in time for Mother’s Day!

This activity will help your student to: 

  1. Understand Rhyming Words
  1. Create a Poem
  1. Inspire Creativity

Definitions:  

Poetry – is a type of creative writing that uses carefully arranged words to invoke emotion.

Rhyming – words that sound the same or are similar in their endings.

Couplets two lines that end in the same rhyme.

Make sure to share your completed projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay 

Spark Curiosity

SPARK  Curiosity – Literacy: Find the Rhyme

Shel Silverstein was an American writer known for his cartoons, songs, and children’s books. He often used rhyming in his poems, giving them a delightful and memorable quality.

In his book Where the Sidewalk Ends is the following poem:

Listen to the mustn’ts child,

listen to the don’ts.

Listen to the shouldn’ts,

the impossibles, the wont’s.

Listen to the never haves,

then listen close to me.

Anything can happen, child,

anything can be.

Can you find the rhyming words contained within the poem? Circle them with a pencil or point them out on the screen! What other words can you think of that rhyme with the ones you’ve selected?

This activity will help your student to: 

  1. Identify Rhyme
  1. Explore Poetry
  1. Practice Literacy Skills

Spark Inspiration

SPARK  Inspiration – Literacy: I Love… to Rhyme!

Let’s make a list of things we love using our knowledge of rhyming words!

Here is one we created. You can fill it in with your own words to create you own “I Love” poem!

“I Love”

I love nature.

I love bugs.

I love giving giant hugs.

I love water.

I love sun.

I love having lots of fun!

This activity will help your student to: 

  1. Practice Rhyming
  1. Create a Poem
  1. Encourage Creativity

Make sure to share your rhyming poems with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay 

Materials for this activity: paper and pencil

Additional Resources


Math

 

Topic: 2-Dimensional Shapes

Spark Discovery

SPARK  Discovery –  Mathematics:  2D Shapes

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we  learn all about 2D shapes! See how many shapes you recognize!  

This activity will help your student to: 

  1. Identify 2D Shapes
  1. Draw 2D Shapes
  1. Recognize Combinations of 2D Shapes 
  1. Inspire Creativity 

Definitions:  

2D Shape – the flat outline of a 3D shape.  

Circle – a round shape with no edges, with all edges equal distance from the center point.

Rectangle – a 4-sided shape with two sets of parallel sides and four right angles. 

Square – a 4-sided shape with equal length sides and four right angles.

Triangle – a 3-sided shape.

Rhombus – a 4-sided shape with equal length sides (diamond).

Trapezoid – a 4-sided shape with one set of parallel sides.

Hexagon – a 6-sided polygon with equal length sides and equal angled corners.

Materials  for this activity: paper and markers or crayons

Spark Curiosity

SPARK  Curiosity  - Mathematics: Out of the Box

Now that we’ve learned all about 2D shapes let’s create some at home.

Use the attached worksheet to practice creating some of the 2D shapes we learned about today. What could you use around your house to create the straight lines around the shapes? Try different objects from sticks, pencils, yarn, etc. to create your shapes. Use markers to trace the names and outlines of the shape names. Pay attention to how many sides each shape has. Look for similarities and differences between them. With a little practice you’ll master the design of 2D shapes! Download your worksheet here.

Make sure to share your completed shapes with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay 

This activity will help your student to: 

  1. Identify 2D Shapes   
  1. Create 2D Shapes
  1. Practice Fine Motor Skills

Materials for this activity: Out of the Box worksheet, pencil, household objects

Spark Inspiration

SPARK  Inspiration – Mathematics: Taking Shape

Shapes make up everything around us. Take a look around, what do you see? How many different shapes can you recognize?

The activity below will help you see shapes all around you.

This activity will help your student to: 

  1. Recognize Familiar 2D Shapes
  1. Design Art with 2D Shapes
  1. Encourage Creativity

Use the attached worksheet to make your own set of 2D shapes. Color them in, cut them out, and see how many different pictures you can create. Can you use all of them in one design? Download your worksheet here.

Show us your fantastic shape designs by sharing with us on social media! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay 

Materials for this activity: worksheet, marker or crayons, scissors

Additional Resources

Additional Resources: 

Go on a 2D shape hunt!

https://www.playdoughtoplato.com/shape-hunt/

Learn a fun song about 2D shapes!

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zhnvcdm

2D shape exploration!

https://pocketofpreschool.com/2d-shape-activities

Suggestions for Older Students

Make your own Tangram shapes and try to replicate the puzzle silhouettes.

https://www.auntannie.com/Geometric/Tangrams/

Have some Cardboard lying around, make a giant Tangram

http://ohhappyday.com/2016/06/diy-giant-tangram/

SC School Standards addressed in this video:

K.G.2. – Identify and describe a given shape and shapes of objects in everyday situations to include two-dimensional shapes (i.e., triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon, and circle) and three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere).

K.G.5. - Draw two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, and circle) and create models of three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere).

1.G.2. - Combine two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, and trapezoid) or three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cube, rectangular prism, cone, and cylinder) in more than one way to form a composite shape.

1.G.4 – Identify and name two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, trapezoid, and circle).


Topic: Currency & Value

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Math: Money Matters

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Simon and friends as we learn all about money!

This activity will help your student to:

1. Develop Math Skills

2. Understand the Value of Money

3. Practice Using Money

Definitions:

Currency/Money - is a unit of exchange used to buy goods and services. Every country has its own type of currency.

Value - how much a certain good or service is worth.

Materials for this activity: play money/real money, objects from your house to “purchase”.

Spark Invention

SPARK Invention – Create Your Own Currency

Currency is what we use to buy the things we want and need. We use the US currency, the dollar, in our daily lives. But do you think you can create your own form of currency?

Money needs to have 5 things to be a good form of currency:

1. Divisible – break it into smaller amounts

2. Portable – you can carry it around

3. Durable – it will last a long time

4. Recognizable – everyone knows what it is

5. Scarce – there is a limited amount of it

Brainstorm and think about what around your home could be used to create your very own form of currency. What is its value? Try to trade with your family to use your form of currency that fits the 5 criteria above. What can you buy with your currency? Would it work if you took it to a store to buy a toy? Why or why not?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Invent new purposes for objects

2. Develop Economic Understanding

3. Encourage Creativity

Materials for this activity: objects from around your home

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Math: Money Tree

Look around your house to see if you can find each of the coins we use as our currency: penny, nickel, dime, quarter, and dollar. Find each of these and see if you can match them to the sizes on the paper. What is the value of each one? Can you fill the paper with your coins to figure out how to complete your very own Money Tree?

This activity will help your student to:

1. Identify US currency

2. Learn Values of Money

3. Practice Addition Equations

4. Use Math in Real Life.

Materials for this activity: worksheet (download here), pennies, dimes, nickels, quarters, 1 dollar

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Play these fun games all about Money!

https://www.usmint.gov/learn/kids

Which one can buy more? Compare the money with these worksheets:

https://www.education.com/slideshow/comparing-money-amounts/

See if you can design your own money while learning about the history of paper money in the US.

https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/money/money_design.pdf


Standards covered in today’s activities:

Math

1.MDA.6 Identify a penny, nickel, dime, and quarter and write the coil value using a ¢ symbol.

2.MDA.7 Solve real-world/story problems involving dollar bills using the $ symbol or involving quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using the ¢ symbol.

4.MDA.2 Solve real-world problems involving distance/length, intervals of time within 12 hours, liquid volume, mass, and money using the four operations.

Social Studies:

2.E.1 Examine the purpose of currency and how income, savings, and spending are parts of a budget.

3.4.2.HS Investigate the economic and land use characteristics of places and regions around the world.


Topic: Measuring & Fractions

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Mathematics: Measuring Up

Watch Today’s Play Video with Ms. Taylor and Simon and learn how to measure ingredients for cooking. Math can lead us on some very tasty adventures!

This activity will help your student to:

  • Understand Parts of a Whole
  • Practice Volume Measurement
  • Recognize Math in Cooking

Definitions:

Estimate – to make an educated guess to the solution of a question or problem.

Measure – the size, capacity, or volume of something that has been determined.

Fraction – a part of a whole. Ex: 1/2, 1/3, 1/4

Roll out your playdough and practice cutting it into different portions. Can you use your ruler to cut your dough into eight equal pieces? How can you make the fractions ¼ and ¾ by removing pieces? Give it a try and have fun exploring how many parts make up a whole!

Materials for this activity: playdough, rolling pin, ruler (to cut dough)

Make sure to share your measuring skills with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Spark Exploration

SPARK Exploration – Mathematics: Marvelous Measurements

Use the attached worksheet to explore with our estimating skills to guess how much our different objects can hold. We will use the different units of volume in order to make our educated guesses. Use your worksheet to learn the customary scale we use in the US. Once you’ve made your guesses use your measuring cup to measure the actual volume of each of the containers. Can you line them up from the most volume to the least? What else could we estimate the volume of?

Materials for this activity: worksheet (HERE), bottle, bowl, pan, cup, spoon, measuring cup, pencil

This activity will help your student to:

  • Compare Measurements
  • Practice Math Skills
  • Analyze Findings

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination: Mathematics: Visual Volume

Volume is the amount of space an object takes up. In a hollow object, like a glass, it refers to the amount of liquid it takes to fill it. This experiment will put your measuring skills to the test. Gather several various shaped glasses and containers. Make sure each of them will hold at least 1 cup of water. Line up your containers and measure out 1cup of water. Now pour your water into the first container. Note how much space it takes up. Now, pour it into the second container. How close did it come to the top? Do this with the remainder of the containers taking note of the results. Even though the volume (1cup) of the water remains the same, its appearance seems to change given the shape of the object it is poured into. Try the same experiment with different measures of water (½ , ¼ , etc).

This activity will help your student to:

  • Understand Volume
  • Practice Measurements
  • Observe Scientific Findings

Materials for this activity: water, measuring cups, containers of various sizes

Make sure to share your projects with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Additional Resources & Standards

Additional Resources:

Measurement Scavenger Hunt

Measure It! Game

Standards covered in these activities:

Second grade math: 2.G.3: Partition squares, rectangles and circles into two or four equal parts, and describe the parts using words halves, fourths, a half of, and a fourth of. Understand that when partitioning a square, rectangle, or circle into two or four equal parts, the parts become smaller as the number of parts increases.

Third grade math: 3.MDA.2: Estimate and measure liquid volumes (capacity) in customary units (cup, pint, quart, gallon) and metric units (mL, L) to the nearest whole unit.

3.NSF.1: Develop an understanding of fractions (denominators 2,3,4,6,8,10) as numbers.

a. A fraction 1/b (called a unit fraction) is the quantity formed by one part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts.

Fourth grade math: 4.MDA.1: convert measurements within a single system of measurement, customary (oz, lb) or metric (mL, L) from a larger to a smaller unit.

4.NSF.3.c : solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole and having like denominators.

Fifth grade math: 5.MDA.1: Convert measurements within a single system of measurement: customary (oz, lb) or metric (mL, L) from a larger to a smaller unit and a smaller to a larger unit.

5.MDA.3: understand the concept of volume measurement.


Health

 

Topic: Emotional Literacy

Spark Imagination

SPARK Imagination - Get Playing

Mr. Rogers once said, “Play gives children a chance to practice what they are learning”. So, we encourage you to set aside time today to head to your own Land of Make Believe with your child today.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Understand and care about peers and the external environment
  • Develop confidence and self-esteem
  • Develop physical coordination
  • Develop focus, creativity and independence
  • Prepare themselves for adulthood
  • Communicate their feelings
  • Make decisions on their own

This activity will help you:

  • Understand the interests, feelings and thoughts of your student
  • Impart values that influences your child’s attitude at home, school and with friends
  • Communicate with your child
  • Learn how your child reacts to success, failures and obstacles
  • Determine the learning style that works best with your child
  • Develop a special bond with your children

Spark Development

SPARK Development - Get Dancing

Fred Rogers was an accomplished musician and loved to express himself through playing the piano. If you play and instrument, share your music with your child. If not, put on some music and have a dance party with your kids. Dance is a fun activity for kids (and you) that exercises both the body and mind.

  • This activity will help your student to:
  • Increase physical development
  • Increase brain development
  • Improve balance and flexibility
  • Reduce stress, depression, and anxiety

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery - Get Exploring

Fred Rogers loved to take his neighbors on trips to factories to see how things worked. Explore this same idea yourself by helping your child to take-a-part an old or broken toy. Look at the components and how they fit and work together.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Improve motor skills
  • Inspire carrier development
  • Understand cause and effect

Topic: Healthy Eating & Food Groups

Spark Discovery

SPARK Discovery – Health & Nutrition: My Plate

Watch Today’s Play Video featuring Ms. Kendal and Simon as we learn how to stay healthy by eating foods from each of the 5 food groups!

Now that you’ve learned all about the foods groups and how they are important to maintaining a healthy diet, it’s time to put your knowledge to the test! Head to your kitchen and match the foods you find to the food group they are from. Make sure to match all 5 and fill up your plate!

This activity will help your student to:

  • Name the 5 Food Groups
  • Recognize Food from Food Groups
  • Recall Health Benefits
  • Make Healthy Food Choices

Definitions:

Food Groups are the way we sort the different foods we eat.

Proteins come from plants and animals. They help keep our muscles strong. Ex: meat, eggs, beans

Grains come from plants. They contain carbohydrates which give us energy. Ex: pasta, rice, cereal

Vegetables come from plants. They give us vitamins and minerals. Ex: broccoli, potatoes, beans

Fruits come from plants. They give us vitamins and minerals. Ex: apples, grapes, strawberries

Dairy comes from milk. It contains calcium which is good for strong bones. Ex: cheese, yogurt, soymilk

Spark Curiosity

SPARK Curiosity – Math: Favorite Foods

Everyone has preferences and today we will see what they are. Your student will contact at least 10 friends or family by phone or other method. Then, using the worksheet provided, collect data about their preferred foods. When the data is complete, help your student to interpret what it means by answering the questions at the bottom of the page.

Materials Needed: “Favorite Foods” worksheet, pen or pencil

Your student will probably come up with variations to the lesson or ways to expand upon it. Encourage them to explore this and make their own questions and graphs after completing the worksheet.

Older students can take this activity a step farther by turning the data into percentages or a pie chart.

This activity will help your student to:

  • Collect Data
  • Make a Graph
  • Interpret the Data
  • Improve Social Engagement

Make sure to share your results with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Download "Favorite Foods" worksheet HERE.

Spark Inspiration

SPARK Inspiration – Health & Nutrition: Kitchen Bingo

It’s important to eat a variety of foods from each of the 5 food groups to ensure we’re keeping our bodies healthy and strong. Can you find foods from all of the different food groups in your kitchen at home? Use the attached worksheet to search your kitchen for tasty food until you strike “bingo”!

Materials Needed: “Kitchen Bingo” worksheet, pen or pencil

  • This activity will help your student to:
  • Sort Healthy Foods
  • Explore Their Surrounds
  • ID & Match Foods

Take a picture and share your completed “Kitchen Bingo” with us! #EdVenture #TodaysPlay

Download Kitchen Bingo HERE.

Additional Resources


Topic: Hand Washing Techniques

Germ Warrior with Simon: Handwashing


Topic: Social Distancing

Germ Warrior with Simon: Social Distancing


Topic: Protocols for Coughs and Sneezes

Germ Warrior with Simon: Coughs and Sneezes


EdVenture Eats, At Home

A new segment of Today's Play, EdVenture Eats, At Home is a compilation of food history, recipes, cooking tips and tricks, and all sorts of information relating to healthy eating, brought to you by our talented EdVenture Cooking Lab Chefs! 

Join us on Fridays at 12:30pm on Facebook Live for new EdVenture Eats, At Home episodes! 


History of Banana Pudding

Banana Pudding, a Southern Staple!

This dish rose to popularity after the Civil War, after improved steamships were able to start bringing larger quantities of bananas to the U.S. from the Caribbean and Central America. Recipes for the dish began appearing in magazines and newspapers as early as 1888, in an issue of Good Housekeeping. The recipe called for a pint of chilled custard, sponge cake and (of course) bananas.

In the 1890s, various versions of the recipe flooded the nation. Some called for ladyfingers instead of sponge cake. Others used tapioca in place of custard. One even called for gelatin to make the dish molded rather than layered.

One of the most lasting alterations to the dish came in the 1920s when recipes started using vanilla wafers as a base instead of sponge cake. Nabisco capitalized on the trend by beginning to print a banana pudding recipe on their Vanilla Wafers box as early as the 1940s.

By the 1960s, Jell-O had begun selling banana cream flavored pudding and pie filling. Combined with pre-made wafers, this made the dessert almost comically easy to make and thus solidified it as a favorite in most kitchens.

What Makes Banana Pudding “Southern”?

There is no obvious answer as to why banana pudding is a quintessential Southern dessert. The South is, of course, closer geographically to the source of bananas, but railroad transport made it no more difficult to get bananas in the North.

It seems the Southern association is due to a multitude of factors. For one, the dish requires no oven (at least in most recipes), so cooks could make it even in the sweltering summer heat. It’s also an extremely sweet dessert, and Southerners are known for their sweet tooths.

One article suggests that the dish is easily produced in large batches, making it the perfect addition to church picnics, family gatherings, tailgates, and other key Southern social events.

Banana Pudding Trifle Recipe

Banana Pudding Trifle

Ingredients

  • 2 (3.4 ounce) boxes instant French vanilla pudding
  • 2½ cups cold lowfat milk
  • 16 ounces heavy whipping cream
  • ⅓ cup powdered sugar
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 (8-ounce) package ⅓ less fat cream cheese, softened
  • 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • Approx. 16 ounces of vanilla wafers cookies (about 1 and ⅓ boxes of cookies)
  • 6 to 8 ripe bananas, sliced

Instructions

In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat together the instant pudding and the milk until well combined. Set aside to thicken. In another bowl, beat the cream until medium to stiff peaks form. Mix in the powdered sugar and vanilla into the whipped cream. In a third bowl, add the softened cream cheese and the sweetened condensed milk and beat until well combined. Fold ⅔ of the whipped cream into the cream cheese/sweetened condensed milk mixture. Then, fold that mixture into the pudding and stir until well combined.

Line the bottom of a trifle dish with some of the cookies. Top with sliced bananas and then ⅓ of the pudding mixture. Add another layer of cookies topped with bananas and then another ⅓ of the pudding mixture. Add a third layer of cookies topped with bananas and then the final ⅓ of the pudding mixture. Add one last layer of cookies, topped with banana slices. Top with remaining whipped cream and a few vanilla wafers for garnish. Refrigerate for at least five hours (or overnight) before serving. Use any extra ingredients that will not fit in the trifle dish to make small individual-sized servings.

Layering from top to bottom should look like whipped cream, bananas, cookies, ⅓ of pudding, bananas, cookies, ⅓ of pudding, bananas, cookies, ⅓ of pudding, bananas, and cookies.


History of Ramen

Ramen’s New York City Moment

Most people have probably experienced instant ramen in some form. A packet of dried noodles is added to water and then a little foil packet of salty goodness stirred in to produce a quick satisfying bowl of noodle soup. But traditional Japanese ramen is so much more. One theory says ramen was first introduced in Japan by Chinese immigrants in the late 19th century. Early versions were wheat noodles topped with Chinese-style roast pork.

The typical Japanese dish you will find today consists of pulled noodles served in a meat or fish-based broth, often flavored with soy sauce or miso, and uses toppings such as sliced pork, dried seaweed, bamboo and scallions. Although these are more traditional toppings, other toppings you might find include bean sprouts, corn, fish cakes, boiled eggs, ground pork and sesame seeds.

There are 4 distinct categories of ramen: tonkotsu (pork bone broth), shoyu (soy sauce), shio (salt ramen, the oldest of the four types), and miso.

In 1958, instant ramen noodles were invented by Momofuku Ando of Nissin Foods in Japan. By 1973, the first Cup O’ Noodles came to America! Now you can find ramen shops all over New York City in each of it’s boroughs. The past few years have seen a spike in the number of ramen restaurants around the city, and the trend doesn’t show any sign of slowing.

With different forms of noodle soup, from pho to matzo ball, and a pasta culture already popular worldwide, ramen has been well-received in the west. “It’s cheap, accessible, and doesn’t require changing your taste or palate at all,” says Barak Kushner, author of “Slurp! A Social and Culinary History of Ramen, Japan’s Favorite Noodle Soup.” “Ramen is like the sandwich of Asia,” universal but easily adaptable to local flavors and ingredients.

The ramen we will be making today is a quick and easy version of shoyu ramen that’s flavorful and doesn’t use the salty packet that comes with instant ramen. It’s sure to impress! Today we will have you peel and slice your egg, diced green onions, prepare garlic and ginger for the broth and pick out your toppings!

Easy Chicken Ramen Recipe

Easy Chicken Ramen Recipe

Makes 1 serving



INGREDIENTS

  • 1 teaspoon ginger (minced)
  • 1/4 cup green onion
  • 1 teaspoon garlic (minced)
  • 1 chicken breast
  • 1 packet of instant ramen noodles, seasoning packet discarded
  • 1 egg (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 10oz Chicken Broth (1/4 cup)
  • 4 tbsp butter
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste


INSTRUCTIONS

1. Start by mincing garlic and ginger (if not pre-minced), cutting green onion into small pieces, and preheating oven to 350 degrees

2. Place chicken breast on separate cutting board and add salt and pepper to chicken, evenly on both sides

3. Cover bottom of oven-safe skillet on medium heat (5-7 setting) with butter

4. Fry both sides of chicken to golden- brown colour, then put skillet in oven. Cook for 20 minutes

5. While chicken is cooking, cover bottom of large pot with butter, then throw ginger and garlic into pot and saute until fragrant, 2-3 minutes

6. Put soy sauce, rice vinegar, and chicken broth into pot. Let simmer for 5-6 minutes.

7. Place eggs into small pot of boiling water. Let boil for 5-6 minutes. Put eggs into bowl of ice-cold water when done. Peel once cool and set aside

8. When chicken is done, place onto new cutting board and cut in half - it should have no pink whatsoever. Cut chicken into pieces, then set aside.

9. When the eggs finish, put new water in small pot then boil noodles for 3 minutes on 7 heat

10. When noodles are done, put into bowl. Add broth, the chicken, then green onion.


Chicken and Cheese Quesadillas with Chef Kenny

Chicken and Cheese Quesadilla Recipe

INGREDIENTS

  • 2-1/2 cups shredded cooked chicken
  • 1/4 cup of sliced bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup of onion
  • 2/3 cup salsa
  • 3/4 to
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, pepper
  • 1/2 garlic powder
  • 6 flour tortillas (8 inches)
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • Sour cream and guacamole


INSTRUCTIONS

In a large skillet, combine the first seven ingredients. Cook, uncovered, over medium heat for 10 minutes or until heated through, stirring occasionally.

Brush one side of tortillas with butter; place buttered side down on a lightly greased skillet. Spoon 1/3 cup chicken mixture over half of each tortilla; sprinkle with 1/3 cup cheese.

Fold plain side of tortilla over cheese. Saute until crispy and golden brown and cheese is melted. Cut into wedges; serve with sour cream and guacamole.


Veggie and Sausage Frittata with Chef Ashley

Veggie and Sausage Frittata Recipe

Yield: 1 large 12” inch skillet, 6 portions


INGREDIENTS

    • ½ cup sweet bell pepper (diced)
    • ½ cup onion (diced)
    • 1/2 cup mushrooms (diced)
    • ½ cup spinach (chopped)
    • ½ cup chicken, pork or veggie sausage (precooked)
    • 6 eggs
    • ½ cup heavy whipping cream or whole milk
    • 2 cups Cheddar cheese
    • 1 tsp. Salt, pepper and seasonings of your choice.
    • **Feel free to add any other vegetables that you would like.**


    INSTRUCTIONS

    • Preheat oven to low broil
    • Lightly grease an oven-proof skillet or pan
    • Chop or dice veggies and saute on medium high heat until softened. Add precooked sausage to veggie mixture
    • In a small mixing bowl, beat eggs, milk or cream, salt, pepper and seasonings.
    • Evenly pour egg mixture onto veggie and sausage mixture. Reduce heat to medium. Don’t stir! Top with cheese. Watch the sides and bottom of the pan begin to slowly bubble and set.
    • When eggs are starting to set, place under broiler, keeping a careful watch on it. Frittata will begin to rise and brown.
    • When golden brown and set, remove from oven and allow to sit 2-3 minutes.

    Chicken, Broccoli & Rice Casserole with Chef Kenny

    Chicken, Broccoli & Rice Casserole Recipe

    Prep Time - 5 minutes
    Cook Time - 1 hour
    Total Time - 1 hour 5 minutes
    Servings - 4
    Calories - 406 kcal


    Ingredients

    • 1 (10.5 oz) can condensed cream of chicken soup
    • ¾ cup water
    • 1 cup uncooked long grain white rice
    • 1 lb. uncooked chicken breast or tenders diced
    • 1 (12.6 oz) bag frozen baby broccoli florets (or cuts)
    • Optional topping: ½ cup grated cheddar cheese*


    Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 375F (190C). Spray a 9 x 13-inch baking dish with cooking spray.
    2. Add cream of chicken soup and water to the prepared dish. Whisk together until completely combined.
    3. Season soup mixture with desired seasonings.
    4. Stir in uncooked rice, uncooked chicken, and frozen broccoli. Season with about ½ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Stir again.
    5. Cover tightly with foil and bake for 1 hour, or until the liquid is absorbed, the rice is tender, and the chicken is cooked through. If desired, sprinkle the top of the casserole with grated cheese and return to the oven for a few more minutes, just until the cheese is melted.

    Healthy Banana Splits with Chef Ashley

    Healthy Banana Splits Recipe


    Healthy Banana Splits

    These banana splits are the perfect breakfast or snack! They are a healthy and fun way to start your day or to snack on when you’ve got a sweet tooth craving. Kids love adding toppings from berries to coconut, to mini chocolate chips. These also make amazing layered fruit parfaits that keep well in the fridge for premade snacks. We will show you both ways to make these yummy banana splits!

    Today you will need:

    Ingredients

    • Bananas
    • Greek yogurt
    • Almond slices
    • Granola
    • Dried coconut
    • Berries of your choice: Blueberries, raspberries or blackberries!
    • Any other fruits you like: pineapple, kiwi, grapes, or mango are delicious!
    • Extra toppings: mini chocolate chips, cinnamon, peanut or almond butter, jam or preserves, chia seeds

    Instructions

    1. Split bananas in half carefully with a knife
    2. Dice your fruit into bite-sized pieces
    3. Added 1/2 cup Greek yogurt to each
    4. Sprinkle with desired toppings
    5. If making into a parfait for later: layer each ingredient, alternating between fruit, yogurt and extra toppings

    Easy Pizzas with Chef Kenny

    Easy Pizza Recipe



    Ingredients:

    • 1 sandwich thin, halved
    • 2 tablespoons pizza sauce
    • 1/4 cup shredded fiesta blend cheese
    • 4 slices of turkey peperoni
    • 1/2 small tomato, diced
    • 1/4 cup of black sliced olives
    • 1/2 small bell pepper, diced
    • 1/4 cup spinach, cut
    • *spices (oregano, basil, garlic powder)
    • *dried herbs (oregano, basil, garlic powder)
    • *olive oil (optional)

    Instructions:

    • Preheat oven to low broil
    • Brush on a little olive oil on the sandwich thins
    • Spread sauce on top of the sandwich thins as well
    • Sprinkle on the shredded cheese.
    • Add any desired toppings
    • Sprinkle on pinch of optional herbs and spices, and add any additional toppings you'd like.
    • Place on baking sheet, broil for 4-5 minutes keeping a close eye on pizzas until cheese is melted and beginning to brown

    Chicken Noodle Soup with Seasonal Veggies

    with Chef Ashley

    Chicken Noodle Soup with Seasonal Veggies Recipe

    Chicken Noodle Soup with Seasonal Veggies

    INGREDIENTS

    • 2 Tbsp olive oil
    • 1 medium sweet onion
    • 4 cloves garlic
    • 4 carrots
    • 4 stalks celery
    • *2 cups of diced assorted seasonal veggies
    • 2 cups cooked chicken
    • 6 cups chicken or vegetable broth
    • 1 tsp dried or fresh basil
    • 1 Tbsp dried or fresh parsley
    • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
    • 1 whole bay leaf
    • freshly cracked pepper
    • 2 1/2 tsp salt
    • 6 oz. egg noodles

    * We will add an additional 2 cups of seasonal veggies like squash, kale, spinach, bell pepper, zucchini or tomato. This is optional. If you want to stick to the traditional carrots, celery and onion, go for it!

    *any of your preferred seasonings are great too! (poultry seasoning, rosemary, oregano, garlic powder, onion powder, Mrs. Dash are all welcome!)

    INSTRUCTIONS

    • Dice the onion and mince the garlic. Add the onion, garlic, and olive oil to a large pot and sauté over medium heat for about 5 minutes, or until the onions are soft and transparent.
    • While the onion and garlic are sautéing, wash and dice the carrots and celery. Add them to the pot and continue to sauté for a few minutes more. If adding additional veggies, wash, dice and add to the saute!
    • Add the breasts to the pot along with the bay leaf, basil, parsley, thyme, some freshly cracked pepper, salt and 6 cups of chicken or veggie stock. Cover the pot, bring it to a boil over high heat, add egg noodles. Boil for an additional 3-4 minutes until noodles soften. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until vegetables reach desired consistency. Taste your soup and add any additional seasonings. Serve and enjoy!

    Blueberry Pancakes with Chef Kenny

    Blueberry Pancakes Recipe

    • 2 cups all purpose flour
    • 2 tablespoons baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 3 tablespoons light brown sugar
    • 2 eggs
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla
    • 1 1/2 cups milk
    • 5 tablespoons butter, melted
    • 2 cups fresh blueberries
    • butter for frying

    Instructions:

    1. In a large bowl whisk the flour, baking powder, salt and brown sugar together.
    2. In separate bowl whisk the eggs, vanilla and milk together.
    3. Add the wet ingredients into the dry and mix until just combined. Lastly mix in the melted butter and stir until combined, the batter will be slightly lumpy. Set the batter aside while you heat your griddle to medium-low heat. Melt a small pat of butter on the griddle and then scoop out 1/4 cup of pancake batter onto the hot griddle and top evenly with blueberries, as many or few as you prefer.
    4. Cook until the edges are set and bubbles form on top of the pancake. Flip and cook until browned.
    5. Serve warm.

    Pizza Dip Recipe


    Ingredients

    • 8 ounces ricotta cheese
    • 4 ounces of cream cheese, softened
    • 3/4 cup shredded mozzarella, plus additional for topping
    • ¼ cup of Parmesan cheese, plus additional for topping
    • ½ cup homemade or low-sodium canned pizza sauce
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon dried or fresh basil
    • 1/2 teaspoon dried or fresh parsley or oregano
    • pinch of black pepper

    Optional ingredients:

    • Chopped pepperoni, turkey sausage, bell pepper, spinach, tomato, onion, olives, pineapple, mushrooms, fresh basil

    Instructions

    • Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.
    • In a bowl, combine ricotta, cream cheese, mozzarella, parmesan cheese and spices. Divide between oven-safe dishes. Top with a layer of sauce and any additional toppings. Top with additional mozzarella and parmesan cheeses.
    • Bake until cheese is melted and beginning to turn golden, 12 minutes.
    • Serve immediately with bagel chips or toasted baguette for dipping!

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